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“The Data Defenders: How Firms Focused on Privacy and Security Make Their Living.” Law.com

December 11, 2017

“Noted class action lawyer Edelson calls for big litigation to cure opioid epidemic, make ‘big pharma’ pay.” Cook County Record.

December 9, 2017

Asserting Congress and local governments either aren't doing enough or lack the resources to address the so-called opioid epidemic impacting communities of all kinds and sizes, the only way to effectively fund treatment and solutions is through litigation, a Chicago class-action attorney said.

“Opioid Suits Are The New Tobacco Litigation, Atty Says.” Law360.

December 6, 2017

The litigation coming out of the opioid crisis will rival the tobacco suits of the 1990s, Jay Edelson of plaintiffs firm Edelson PC told an audience during a Chicago City Club panel on the drugs and possible solutions to the epidemic of addiction.

“Chicago Sues Uber Over Data Breach.” MediaPost.

November 28, 2017

The City of Chicago and Cook County tapped privacy lawyer Jay Edelson to serve as special prosecuting counsel in case against Uber over revelations that the company attempted to cover up a 2016 data breach that exposed personal information of 57 million people.

“More than 80 Harvey-related lawsuits have piled up as judges vet lawyers.” Houston Chronicle.

November 2, 2017

Jay Edelson, a Chicago lawyer who was the first of several Wednesday to present his leadership proposal to the judges, said afterward that the nearly five-hour session stood out in terms of productivity. The vetting hearings are usually spent with lawyers touting their credentials, but in this instance he said the court cut to the chase.

“Trump Election Commissioner’s Voter Database Is a Ripe Target for Hackers.” Mother Jones.

October 23, 2017

Kris Kobach calls the program a model for the country. It has major security problems.

“Spokeo lawsuit highlights challenge of protecting privacy in digital age.” Los Angeles Times.

August 29, 2017

For anyone who feels powerless about controlling their personal information in a world of search engines and public databases, take heart. A recent court ruling suggests you might have more muscle than you thought.

“PayPal Redirects Charitable Contributions Without Consent, Lawsuit Says.” The New York Times.

March 1, 2017

Class action alleges that thousands of donors have been misled by PayPal Giving Fund, and that their gifts never reached the intended charities.

“Q&A: Why Class Action Reform Bill Isn’t as Bad as It Seems” The National Law Journal.

February 17, 2017

One of the most expansive bills to target class actions in the past decade quietly passed through the House Judiciary Committee this week, prompting plaintiffs attorneys, civil rights groups and consumer advocates to spring into action.

Facing a Data Breach Suit Without the Data Breach? ‘Scary.’ The American Lawyer.

December 13, 2016

With a track record of winning cases against some of the country’s biggest tech companies, and expanding liability for data privacy blunders in the process, Edelson is a difficult lawyer to bet against.

“Chicago Law Firm Accused of Lax Data Security in Lawsuit.” Bloomberg Law.

December 9, 2016

A federal judge on Friday unveiled a long sealed proposed class-action complaint that accused the law firm, Johnson & Bell, of failing to take adequate steps to protect the data on its servers.

“Maneuver in receipt privacy class action earns AllSaints $58K sanction from federal judge.” Cook County Record.

December 8, 2016

Retail clothier failed to persuade a federal judge to dismiss a class action lawsuit and has been stuck with a bill for $58,000 for its opponents’ legal costs, as the federal judge sent the case back to Cook County for further proceedings.

“Prominent class action firm sues ‘professional objectors’ for racketeering.” Reuters.

December 5, 2016

Edelson files suit against notorious class action objectors alleging that they are engaging in an ongoing scheme to extort class action lawyers via frivolous objections to proposed settlements.

“The Privacy Advisor Podcast: Jay Edelson.” iapp.

October 31, 2016

Jay Edelson is now one of best-known lawyers in the field, in part because of his aggressive pursuit of giant tech firms and their uses of consumer data.

“Modernizing Vs. Weakening The TCPA.” Law360.

September 30, 2016

The FCC and our judicial system have provided a comprehensive process to update the TCPA and keep it current with ever changing technology. Any changes at the congressional level should be done carefully and in a nuanced fashion to avoid opening sought-after loopholes that have unintended consequences.

“Edelson Firm Turns Back Spokeo Defense in Case against Gannett.” Legal Newsline.

September 14, 2016

Months after a U.S. Supreme Court ruling said those who bring lawsuits must show a "concrete and particularized" harm, the plaintiffs attorneys involved have defeated a defense attempting to use that ruling in another case. A judge ruled this month that providing personally identifiable information to a third party obtained from app users' viewing data can cause the users harm.

“Lawsuit Claims Smartphone-Enabled Massage Device Violated Privacy.” Chicago Tribune.

September 13, 2016

A Chicago-area woman is suing the maker of We-Vibe, claiming the smartphone-enabled personal massager secretly transmitted "highly intimate and sensitive data" of her usage to the company in real time. The lawsuit, filed this month in a Chicago federal court, seeks class-action status for "tens of thousands" of We-Vibe users, whose data allegedly was collected without consent by Standard Innovation, the device's Canadian manufacturer, in violation of privacy and consumer fraud laws.

“Cruise Cos. Settle Robocall Class Action For Up To $76M.” Law360.

September 8, 2016

Attorneys litigating a massive class action accusing several cruise marketing companies of violating the Telephone Consumer Protection Act by robocalling millions of Americans with offers for free trips told an Illinois federal judge overseeing the case Thursday that they had reached a settlement that could see the companies paying out up to $76 million.

“Gannett Can’t Escape Privacy Suit Over USA Today App.” Law360.

September 2, 2016

A Massachusetts federal judge won't let USA Today parent company Gannett Co. off the hook for allegedly collecting app users' video viewing data and sharing it with another company, ruling on Friday that disclosing personally identifiable information could indeed cause users harm.

“Mic Check: Suit Says Warriors App Uses Phone to Listen In on Fans.” Law.com

August 30, 2016

That’s the claim that lawyers at Edelson P.C. have made in a suit filed in San Francisco federal court on Monday against the San Francisco Bay Area’s National Basketball Association franchise and two companies that helped the team build its mobile app.

“Law Firms and Data Breaches: Sensitive Data and Dangerous Practices.” Junto.

August 23, 2016

A Q&A with Jay Edelson of Edelson PC Hacking incidents at law firms have led to major data breach events in recent months. Even as all law firms store and handle sensitive client data, many of the smaller organizations tend to lack robust cybersecurity policies and procedures.

Better with Age: Chicago’s Top Ten Startup Founders over 40

August 8, 2016

"Jay Edelson is the founder & CEO of 50-employee Chicago-based Edelson PC. Picture a stereotypical startup – workers scurrying about on hover boards throughout an open office, playing ping-pong, making music videos to team-build, playing around with the Oculus Rift, wearing flip-flops and short or jeans and hoodies as weather-appropriate, being entrepreneurial at every turn – and that’s Edelson . . . ."

“Cravath Alternative: $150K Now… Much, Much More At Bonus Time.” Above The Law.

June 27, 2016

"For a Biglaw player, there’s really no excuse at this point for lagging behind the market in compensation. It’s just throwing up a white flag to be hemming and hawing about compensation — at least in the top markets — at this point. . . ."  

“Panama Papers Fallout: What If Your Lawyer Gets Hacked?” InformationWeek.

May 31, 2016

"Your company has likely spent a lot of time, effort, and money keeping its security systems, policies, and practices up to date. Can the same be said of your law firm?

The legal industry isn't exactly known for its technology leadership, which should be of concern, especially from a security perspective. Don't assume that your data is safe, in other words. Be prepared to do your own due diligence. . . ."

“High Court Gets It Right With ‘Spokeo’ Decision.” The National Law Journal

May 31, 2016

"In Spokeo v. Robins, in which we represented the plaintiff, Spokeo Inc. made the unprecedented argument to the U.S. Supreme Court that to establish "injury in fact" standing in statutory cases, the plaintiff must allege "real-world" or "palpable" harm beyond the statutory violation. Not only did Spokeo's argument fail to secure five votes, it didn't garner any. . . ."

“Peter Thiel Proves Silicon Valley Only Hates Lawsuits When It’s the One Getting Sued.” Quartz.

May 27, 2016

"Silicon Valley purports to hate the legal system. To hear the tech world tell it, lawyers are leeches and regulations are mostly outdated. Lawsuits stifle innovation and waste money that startups could better spend developing products and recruiting more users, thereby making the world a better place. . . ."

“Trump’s Wall Misses the Mark: We Need a Cyber Wall, Not a Physical One.” TechCrunch.

May 27, 2016

"The issues for the general election campaign have, to a great extent, already been framed. And Donald Trump, being the world-class marketer he is, has successfully forced a debate about whether the U.S. needs to build a wall across the 1,954 miles of our southern border to secure our great nation. . . ."

“Tech Companies Take Their Legislative Concerns to the States.” The New York Times.

May 27, 2016

"The Biometric Information Privacy Act of Illinois is not a law many are familiar with. But if you have ever shared a photo on social media, the little-known statute turns out to be one of the nation’s toughest regulations for how companies like Facebook and Google can use facial recognition technologies to identify you online. . . ."

“Six Concussion Suits Are Filed Against Colleges and N.C.A.A.” The New York Times

May 17, 2016

Several former college football players filed class-action lawsuits Tuesday against their universities, conferences and the N.C.A.A., claiming negligence over their handling of head injuries. The spate of cases — six were filed Tuesday — marks a new effort by athletes seeking financial relief for what they say are the lasting effects from concussions sustained in their college careers. . . .

“Supreme Court Rules Spokeo Not Done with Privacy Lawsuit.” CNET.

May 16, 2016

The US Supreme Court kicked a contentious privacy lawsuit back to a lower court on Monday, essentially telling the 9th US District Court of Appeals it hadn't answered all the necessary questions when ruling that people search engine Spokeo had harmed a user by displaying inaccurate information. . . .

“Class-Action Suit Targeting Law Firm Privacy Protections Could Be Unsealed.” BloombergBNA.

May 5, 2016

Edelson PC announces it has filed a federal class-action under seal that targets a Chicago-based regional law firm for data security holes, and that it's moving the Court to unseal the complaint against the unnamed firm. . . .

“Theranos Exposes the Perverse Incentives at Work in Silicon Valley.” Quartz.

April 29, 2016

"Theranos, the health technology company once valued at $9 billion, is making its investors’ blood run cold... While the rise and fall of Theranos has been dramatic, it is far from a rare case. . . ."

“Michigan is about to let more of your privacy go to data miners.” MLive.

April 20, 2016

Silicon Valley hates privacy laws. And it's no surprise why. Companies like Facebook, Google and Instagram succeed by collecting and monetizing consumer data . . .

“Breaking Down the Class Action Lawsuit Against Kanye & TIDAL Over ‘Life of Pablo’ Release.” DJBooth.

April 18, 2016

Much of the discussion around the release of Kanye West's The Life of Pablo album has centered around its ground-breaking nature and constantly evolving musical updates, but underneath the art a different story has been unfolding. . . .

“Meet the Man Disrupting Silicon Valley.” Chicago Lawyer Magazine.

April 4, 2016

He’s seen Silicon Valley’s vision for the future, and it’s enough to keep him awake at night. If the tech wizards get their way, says Chicago attorney Jay Edelson, we will soon be living in a world of total interconnectivity. . . .

“Local Counsel May Be Weak Point in Big Law’s Cyberdefense.” The American Lawyer.

March 31, 2016

As big law firms come to grips with the need to defend against cyberattacks, some may not be doing enough to address a potential blind spot: other law firms. . . .

“Threats of Litigation After Data Breaches at Major Law Firms.” Bloomberg BNA.

March 30, 2016

Reports on Wednesday that both Weil Gotshal & Manges and Cravath, Swaine & Moore as well as other firms have suffered data breaches in recent months, put new attention on the potential consequences for law firms with lax security.

“We’ve been saying for a long time that law firms are major targets,” said Jay Edelson, founder of Edelson, a plaintiff’s side class-action firm that focuses on privacy-related suits. . . .

“Apple demands to know how FBI cracked San Bernardino iPhone.” TechRepublic.

March 30, 2016

On Monday, the Justice Department dropped its case against Apple after it was able to unlock the iPhone used by San Bernardino shooter, Syed Farook, with the help of an "outside party." Now, Apple wants to know just how they did it. . . .

“The FBI has a big ulterior motive in its fight against Apple.” Quartz.

March 18, 2016

When a public interest group wants to create new legal precedent, its first step is to find a client with sympathetic facts. But the public may not realize that the government employs this legal tactic as well. . . .

“Data Vampires.” pivot.

March 10, 2016

A diverse group of civil liberties advocates come together to battle data vampires, little known corporate entities that gather and manipulate people's personal information in an effort to influence consumer behavior with startling specificity. . . .

“Commentary: Why Apple is right to tangle with the FBI.” Chicago Tribune.

February 24, 2016

For the past decade I've spent my professional life fighting tech giants over consumer privacy issues. I've been called Silicon Valley's "most feared and loathed" attorney, "tech's baby-faced boogeyman" and — my personal favorite — a "leech tarted up as a freedom fighter." Given that, I never thought I would be standing with Apple in a high-stakes privacy battle. . . .

“Strategy To End Class Actions Might Just Wind Up Costing Companies More.” Forbes.

January 25, 2016

The U.S. Supreme Court’s decision in Campbell-Ewald v. Gomez seemed to leave open the possibility companies could pay off the representative plaintiff in a class action and thus stop the larger lawsuit before it begins...

Even if a defendant company convinces a judge to accept payment on behalf of a plaintiff who doesn’t want it, attorney Jay Edelson with Edelson PC in Chicago said the strategy ultimately is doomed to fail. . . .

“Pick-Offs After Campbell-Ewald: Some Predictions.” Law360.

January 21, 2016

On Wednesday, the U.S. Supreme Court rightly rejected Campbell-Ewald Co.’s attempt to settle out plaintiff Jose Gomez’s individual claim to, in Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s words, “avoid a potential adverse decision, one that would expose it to damages a thousand-fold larger than the bid Gomez declined to accept.” . . .

“Facial Recognition: Who’s Tracking You in Public?” Consumer Reports.

December 30, 2015

The mall is crowded, including the department store that keeps your family supplied with everything from handbags to business suits. Moments after you enter, a saleswoman walks up holding a tablet. She smiles and greets you by name. Are you shopping for yourself or your spouse today? We’ve moved things around since you were here in December—let me help you find your way, she says. . . .

“Plaintiffs Firm Edelson Brings Privacy Prowess To SF.” Law360.

November 4, 2015

Plaintiffs class action firm and privacy litigation heavyweight Edelson PC revealed Tuesday that it has set up shop in San Francisco, a move that the Chicago-based firm said would allow it to file more suits and put more pressure on Silicon Valley companies. . . .

“Privacy Class Action Firm Opens SF Office.” The Recorder.

November 3, 2015

Edelson PC, the Chicago-based plaintiffs firm that specializes in privacy litigation, will open its second office Tuesday in San Francisco. The new South of Market digs will put Edelson closer to key federal courts—and to the technology companies the firm frequently torments with class actions. . . .

“Supreme Court Case Pits Privacy Rights Against Internet Data Brokers.” Los Angeles Times.

November 2, 2015

The Supreme Court is set to hear a clash between privacy laws that protect American consumers and the desire of online data providers to avoid potentially crippling lawsuits if they post inaccurate information on the Web. . . .

“Disputed Web Profile Gives U.S. High Court Chance to Curb Suits.” Bloomberg.

November 2, 2015

Thomas Robins says the online profile he found under his name six years ago bore little resemblance to his real self...

That dossier, compiled by the data broker Spokeo Inc., is now at the center of what may be the biggest business case of the U.S. Supreme Court’s nine-month term. . . .

“Yelp-For-People App Raises Questions.” MediaPost.

October 2, 2015

On Wednesday, the Washington Post introduced the world to the forthcoming app Peeple, which will let people publicly post ratings about other people.

Since then, the concept of a Yelp-for-people has proven almost universally unpopular with observers, who are warning that Peeple will inevitably lead to abuse. . . .

“Twitter Hit With Suit Claiming It Snoops on Direct Messages.” The Wall Street Journal.

September 15, 2015

On Wednesday, the Washington Post introduced the world to the forthcoming app Peeple, which will let people publicly post ratings about other people.

Since then, the concept of a Yelp-for-people has proven almost universally unpopular with observers, who are warning that Peeple will inevitably lead to abuse. . . .

“White House Supports Consumers’ Right To Sue Data Brokers.” MediaPost.

September 11, 2015

Joining a roster of privacy advocates, the Obama administration is urging the Supreme Court to rule that consumers have the right to sue data aggregators for posting incorrect information online. . . .

“Class Actions And The Separation Of Powers: A Spokeo Debate.” Reuters.

September 1, 2015

Today is one of those days when I am really glad not to be a justice of the U.S. Supreme Court. They only get the tough cases. . . .

“The Rise and Fall of a Bitcoin Kingpin.” Rolling Stone.

August 27, 2015

Just after sunrise on August 1st, Tokyo police stormed into a sleek two-story townhouse on a quiet residential street in Japan's capital and arrested Mark Karpeles, the 30-year-old head of Mt. Gox, the largest bitcoin exchange in the world. . . .

“Edelson Adds Cybercrime Prosecutor.” Chicago Daily Law Bulletin.

August 26, 2015

The next time Edelson P.C. takes a tech foe to court, the firm will have a former cybercrime prosecutor on its side. . . .

“Chicago Law Firm Adds Staff To Fight Facebook (And Others Over Privacy).” Crain’s.

August 25, 2015

A Chicago law firm known for suing Facebook, Google and other tech giants is expanding its roster of lawyers by nearly half to tackle a booming caseload. . . .

“Facebook Readies for Battle Over Biometrics” The Recorder.

August 19, 2015

Three suits accuse its tagging feature of violating an Illinois law that carries hefty statutory penalties. . . .

“Autodialers on High Alert Over FCC Ruling.” Direct Marketing News.

July 29, 2015

Marketers who use text messages and automated phone calls are fretting that the Federal Communications Commission's recent order interpreting the Telephone Consumer Protection Act of 1991 (TCPA) will hurt consumers more than it will help them. Two trade associations have filed petitions in appeals court challenging the ruling, and corporate defense attorneys fear an increase in class action lawsuits. . . .

“Class Action Suits Question Who Owns Pics Posted on Social Media.” Claims Journal.

July 16, 2015

Facebook’s handling of your headshot is now the subject of class action lawsuits that pose the question: When someone turns your mug into data, are those digits theirs or yours? . . .

“Media, tech companies ask SCOTUS to restrict class actions in Spokeo.” Reuters.

July 15, 2015

It would have been shocking if big business hadn’t turned out in force to back the search engine Spokeo at the U.S. Supreme Court, in a case with potentially huge consequences for class action defendants. . . .

“Tech industry wants your face, but not your permission.” Deutsche Welle.

June 17, 2015

Discussions between privacy advocates and tech companies about facial recognition technology have broken down. The industry would not commit itself to obtaining users' consent before collecting their biometric data. . . .

“Facial recognition technology is everywhere. It may not be legal.” The Washington Post.

June 11, 2015

Privacy advocates and representatives from companies like Facebook and Google are meeting in Washington on Thursday to try to set rules for how companies should use this powerful technology. They may be forgetting that a good deal of it could already be illegal. . . .

“‘Internet of Things’ Could Drive Litigation Uptick.” New Jersey Law Journal.

June 11, 2015

Lax security for the growing number of appliances, televisions, cars and other everyday items connected to the Internet will prompt a wave of litigation in coming years, some lawyers have predicted. . . .

“NCPA: Lead plaintiff in NCAA concussion case opposes settlement.” CBS Sports.

June 9, 2015

The lead plaintiff in the NCAA’s concussion lawsuit says he never agreed to a preliminary settlement before a federal judge and has fired his lawyer, according to a statement released Tuesday by the National College Players Association. . . .

“Panel Sees More Data Breach Litigation on the Horizon.” The Legal Intelligencer.

June 3, 2015

A panel of national data-security attorneys agreed at a cybersecurity conference Tuesday that data breach litigation is expanding in almost every way, and big changes are coming soon. . . .

“The Key To Hiring The Best Summer Associates.” Law360.

May 26, 2015

A law firm’s summer associate program can be a great way for both firms and attorneys-in-training to figure out whether they have a future together, but it's still easy to be wrong.

Law firms will soon be struggling to find top talent in the avalanche of resumes they receive for summer associate positions, but law firms first need to ask some tough questions of themselves, experts say. . . .

“The Legal Power of ‘Standing’.” The New York Times.

May 14, 2015

It just goes to show the importance of jurisdiction. Recently, the Supreme Court added a new case to its docket for next year, Spokeo v. Robins, which is about a technical question of jurisdiction — when a plaintiff has “standing” to sue in federal court. . . .

“Filing: NFL concussion settlement shows NCAA deal can’t be approved.” CBS Sports.

May 12, 2015

A federal judge's recent approval of the NFL's concussion settlement demonstrates why the NCAA's proposed concussion deal “falls far outside the range of possible approval,” lawyers for a former San Diego State football player claim. . . .

“Supreme Court to Hear ‘Non-Injury’ Privacy Class Action.” E-Commerce Times.

May 6, 2015

The U.S. Supreme Court last month granted a request from Spokeo, a data aggregator, to consider whether the legal basis litigants must meet to file a claim in federal court should be broadly or narrowly defined. . . .

“Athletes’ Attorney Slams New NCAA Concussion Deal As ‘Window Dressing.’” CBS Chicago.

April 17, 2015

Attorneys representing college athletes in a concussion lawsuit against the NCAA have criticized a proposed settlement. . . .

“Surf, Cry, Sue: Tort lawyers could burst class-action floodgates unless High Court acts.” The Wall Street Journal.

April 16, 2015

Trial lawyers have built an empire chasing the potentially injured and convincing them to sue. But what if a multimillion-dollar lawsuit required no injury at all? . . .

“Facebook Hit With Lawsuit for Scanning, Storing Users’ Facial Data.” Newsweek.

April 7, 2015

Have you ever uploaded pictures onto Facebook and found that the site has automatically identified the people in each image, asking if you’d like to tag them?

This “tag suggestion” feature comes courtesy of the site’s facial recognition software, added in 2010, which a class-action lawsuit filed April 1 says violates users’ privacy. . . .

“Jay Edelson, the Class-Action Lawyer Who May Be Tech’s Least Friended Man.” The New York Times.

April 4, 2015

When technology executives imagine the boogeyman, they see a baby-face guy in wire-rim glasses. His name is Jay Edelson.

“Titan Of The Plaintiffs Bar: Jay Edelson.” Law360.

October 1, 2014

While working as a defense attorney in the late 1990s, Jay Edelson realized something was missing. So he built a plaintiffs' firm that offered just what he was craving. . . .

Let the Externs Get Paid

March 6, 2014

Last month the American Bar Association’s (ABA) Section of Legal Education Standards Review Committee recommended that the organization reverse its policy forbidding law students from being paid to participate in for-credit externships. That’s good news both for law students and our profession as a whole. . . .

“Plaintiff Seeks to Freeze Mt. Goxs’ U.S. Assets.” The New York Times.

March 5, 2014

Customers of Mt. Gox are trying to freeze assets in the United States of the bankrupt Bitcoin exchange and its chief executive, Mark Karpeles. There’s just one problem: They don’t know where those assets are.

Plaintiffs in a class-action lawsuit filed a motion on Tuesday seeking a temporary injunction to keep Mr. Karpeles or his company from moving any money outside of the United States. . . .

Rethinking the Law Firm Recruitment Model

February 6, 2014

Currently, all of the big firms tend to compete for the same few thousand candidates: second-years at top-tier law schools with strong grades and enough social skills to survive the interview process. But once you step outside of this echelon of the law school hierarchy, the reality is grim. . . .

It’s Time for Lawyers to Start Helping Their Clients Make Data-Driven Decisions

January 23, 2014

Today, we address another area in which lawyers and law firms have struggled to advance: measurability. Specifically, we’re talking about measuring the probability of success or failure (however those terms are defined) to assist in rendering legal advice to clients. . . .

“Pardon the Disruption: The second thing that needs to go—the law school model (Part 2).” Thomson Reuters.

December 12, 2013

Prior to the Thanksgiving holiday, we discussed the not-so-novel proposition that the U.S. legal education system requires a healthy dose of reform... In today’s post, we take principles from CIC and apply them to legal scholarship. . . .

“Spaces: The games are always on at Edelson.” Chicago Lawyer.

December 1, 2013

The orange tape lining the floor of Edelson LLC’s main lobby area is designed to mimic the lines on a tennis court — except it wraps up along a wall and part of the ceiling. The aesthetic is not accidental. . . .

“Pardon the Disruption: The second thing that needs to go—the law school model (Part 1).” Thomson Reuters.

November 21, 2013

Talk has been swirling for a while about the need to overhaul the legal education system. JD candidates crossing the stage in recent years have exited with a hefty tab and a degree that guarantees few job opportunities. And despite almost a decade of excess supply, some are claiming that law schools are running out of cash. . . .

“Pardon the Disruption: The first thing that needs to go—the billable hour.” Thomson Reuters.

November 7, 2013

The legal industry has been painfully slow to embrace change. While all around us industries re-invent themselves to reflect the times, our complexion is largely the same as it was 15 years ago . . .

“The ATL Interrogatories: 10 Questions with Jay Edelson.” Above the Law.

October 16, 2013

Jay Edelson is the founder and managing partner of Edelson LLC, a national consumer class action firm. Edelson LLC focuses on consumer technology, privacy, and banking litigation, and has secured settlements valued at over $1 billion in the last five years. . . .

“Beyond the Ping-Pong Table: Lessons for Lawyers From Startup Companies.” The National Law Journal.

September 30, 2013

"The legal field has remained tone deaf to the lessons of America's startup culture. That's unfortunate, because startups can serve as a model for innovative, efficient and invigorating work environments. . . ."
 

“End the Summer Associate Sideshow (and start treating them like the almost-lawyers they are).” Bloomberg Law.

August 20, 2013

Today’s typical summer associate program is a creature of the decades-old traditional law practice. Not unlike other aspects of that tradition, while it was born out of well meaning principles (most significantly: “attract the best and the brightest”), it has now lost its way. . . .

“The Best Law Firm Offices in America: The Finalists!” Above The Law.

August 30, 2012

Edelson McGuire’s space in Chicago might just be the coolest law office ever. A compliment to the firm’s website, the Chicago office has helped brand the boutique as an emerging leader in high-stakes technology class actions, privacy suits, and other national litigation. Taking up the entire 13th floor in a building just North of the river, if someone didn’t tell you it was a law firm you’d think they were busily coming up with the next big website or app…. [T]he office’s exposed ceilings (complete with industrial vents and piping) contrast with the hi-tech look of the office walls to provide an unmistakable start-up feel all their own.

“Court Reinstates Suit by Chicago Homeowner Against Wells Fargo.” Chicago Tribune.

March 8, 2012

A Chicago homeowner who was denied participation in a federal mortgage modification program can sue her lender for fraud and other claims, a federal appellate court said this week. . . .

“9 Mistakes Companies Make In Consumer Class Actions.” Law 360.

January 20, 2011

"Dealing with consumer class actions is one of the more significant challenges facing companies today. Innovation moves light years faster than changes in the law. . ."

“Trust Young Lawyers & They Won’t Let You Down.” American Bar Association.

October 15, 2009

Law firms are notoriously bad at training newly-minted attorneys and developing them into meaningful contributors.The problem begins with structure. . . .

“Battling Bullies: Chicago Litigator Takes on Power Brokers.” Of Counsel.

March 1, 2018

Big banks. Big tech firms. Big Pharma. The big business that is the NCAA. Plaintiff’s attorney Jay Edelson wages battle against many of the nation’s most fortified institutions. Not only does he refuse to back down to anyone, regardless of their stature or deep pockets, he welcomes the challenge.

“The Opioid Epidemic.” City Club of Chicago.

December 6, 2017

Moderated by Hon. Toni Preckwinkle, featuring Hon. Patrick Kennedy, Jay Edelson, and Dr. Steven Aks

“The Privacy Advisor Podcast: Jay Edelson.” iapp.

October 31, 2016

Jay Edelson is now one of best-known lawyers in the field, in part because of his aggressive pursuit of giant tech firms and their uses of consumer data.

“Modernizing Vs. Weakening The TCPA.” Law360.

September 30, 2016

The FCC and our judicial system have provided a comprehensive process to update the TCPA and keep it current with ever changing technology. Any changes at the congressional level should be done carefully and in a nuanced fashion to avoid opening sought-after loopholes that have unintended consequences.

“Law Firms and Data Breaches: Sensitive Data and Dangerous Practices.” Junto.

August 23, 2016

A Q&A with Jay Edelson of Edelson PC Hacking incidents at law firms have led to major data breach events in recent months. Even as all law firms store and handle sensitive client data, many of the smaller organizations tend to lack robust cybersecurity policies and procedures.

“High Court Gets It Right With ‘Spokeo’ Decision.” The National Law Journal

May 31, 2016

"In Spokeo v. Robins, in which we represented the plaintiff, Spokeo Inc. made the unprecedented argument to the U.S. Supreme Court that to establish "injury in fact" standing in statutory cases, the plaintiff must allege "real-world" or "palpable" harm beyond the statutory violation. Not only did Spokeo's argument fail to secure five votes, it didn't garner any. . . ."

“Peter Thiel Proves Silicon Valley Only Hates Lawsuits When It’s the One Getting Sued.” Quartz.

May 27, 2016

"Silicon Valley purports to hate the legal system. To hear the tech world tell it, lawyers are leeches and regulations are mostly outdated. Lawsuits stifle innovation and waste money that startups could better spend developing products and recruiting more users, thereby making the world a better place. . . ."

“Trump’s Wall Misses the Mark: We Need a Cyber Wall, Not a Physical One.” TechCrunch.

May 27, 2016

"The issues for the general election campaign have, to a great extent, already been framed. And Donald Trump, being the world-class marketer he is, has successfully forced a debate about whether the U.S. needs to build a wall across the 1,954 miles of our southern border to secure our great nation. . . ."

“Theranos Exposes the Perverse Incentives at Work in Silicon Valley.” Quartz.

April 29, 2016

"Theranos, the health technology company once valued at $9 billion, is making its investors’ blood run cold... While the rise and fall of Theranos has been dramatic, it is far from a rare case. . . ."

“Michigan is about to let more of your privacy go to data miners.” MLive.

April 20, 2016

Silicon Valley hates privacy laws. And it's no surprise why. Companies like Facebook, Google and Instagram succeed by collecting and monetizing consumer data . . .

“The FBI has a big ulterior motive in its fight against Apple.” Quartz.

March 18, 2016

When a public interest group wants to create new legal precedent, its first step is to find a client with sympathetic facts. But the public may not realize that the government employs this legal tactic as well. . . .

“Commentary: Why Apple is right to tangle with the FBI.” Chicago Tribune.

February 24, 2016

For the past decade I've spent my professional life fighting tech giants over consumer privacy issues. I've been called Silicon Valley's "most feared and loathed" attorney, "tech's baby-faced boogeyman" and — my personal favorite — a "leech tarted up as a freedom fighter." Given that, I never thought I would be standing with Apple in a high-stakes privacy battle. . . .

“Pick-Offs After Campbell-Ewald: Some Predictions.” Law360.

January 21, 2016

On Wednesday, the U.S. Supreme Court rightly rejected Campbell-Ewald Co.’s attempt to settle out plaintiff Jose Gomez’s individual claim to, in Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s words, “avoid a potential adverse decision, one that would expose it to damages a thousand-fold larger than the bid Gomez declined to accept.” . . .

Let the Externs Get Paid

March 6, 2014

Last month the American Bar Association’s (ABA) Section of Legal Education Standards Review Committee recommended that the organization reverse its policy forbidding law students from being paid to participate in for-credit externships. That’s good news both for law students and our profession as a whole. . . .

Rethinking the Law Firm Recruitment Model

February 6, 2014

Currently, all of the big firms tend to compete for the same few thousand candidates: second-years at top-tier law schools with strong grades and enough social skills to survive the interview process. But once you step outside of this echelon of the law school hierarchy, the reality is grim. . . .

It’s Time for Lawyers to Start Helping Their Clients Make Data-Driven Decisions

January 23, 2014

Today, we address another area in which lawyers and law firms have struggled to advance: measurability. Specifically, we’re talking about measuring the probability of success or failure (however those terms are defined) to assist in rendering legal advice to clients. . . .

“Pardon the Disruption: The second thing that needs to go—the law school model (Part 2).” Thomson Reuters.

December 12, 2013

Prior to the Thanksgiving holiday, we discussed the not-so-novel proposition that the U.S. legal education system requires a healthy dose of reform... In today’s post, we take principles from CIC and apply them to legal scholarship. . . .

“Pardon the Disruption: The second thing that needs to go—the law school model (Part 1).” Thomson Reuters.

November 21, 2013

Talk has been swirling for a while about the need to overhaul the legal education system. JD candidates crossing the stage in recent years have exited with a hefty tab and a degree that guarantees few job opportunities. And despite almost a decade of excess supply, some are claiming that law schools are running out of cash. . . .

“Pardon the Disruption: The first thing that needs to go—the billable hour.” Thomson Reuters.

November 7, 2013

The legal industry has been painfully slow to embrace change. While all around us industries re-invent themselves to reflect the times, our complexion is largely the same as it was 15 years ago . . .

“The ATL Interrogatories: 10 Questions with Jay Edelson.” Above the Law.

October 16, 2013

Jay Edelson is the founder and managing partner of Edelson LLC, a national consumer class action firm. Edelson LLC focuses on consumer technology, privacy, and banking litigation, and has secured settlements valued at over $1 billion in the last five years. . . .

“Beyond the Ping-Pong Table: Lessons for Lawyers From Startup Companies.” The National Law Journal.

September 30, 2013

"The legal field has remained tone deaf to the lessons of America's startup culture. That's unfortunate, because startups can serve as a model for innovative, efficient and invigorating work environments. . . ."
 

“End the Summer Associate Sideshow (and start treating them like the almost-lawyers they are).” Bloomberg Law.

August 20, 2013

Today’s typical summer associate program is a creature of the decades-old traditional law practice. Not unlike other aspects of that tradition, while it was born out of well meaning principles (most significantly: “attract the best and the brightest”), it has now lost its way. . . .

“9 Mistakes Companies Make In Consumer Class Actions.” Law 360.

January 20, 2011

"Dealing with consumer class actions is one of the more significant challenges facing companies today. Innovation moves light years faster than changes in the law. . ."

“Trust Young Lawyers & They Won’t Let You Down.” American Bar Association.

October 15, 2009

Law firms are notoriously bad at training newly-minted attorneys and developing them into meaningful contributors.The problem begins with structure. . . .

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