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“Edelson Nabs Interim Lead In Tech Giant Gambling App MDL” Law360.

September 23, 2021

A California federal judge on Thursday appointed Edelson PC interim class counsel in multidistrict litigation accusing Apple, Google and Facebook of illegally peddling slot machines and other Las Vegas-style gambling games on their platforms while raking in billions in revenue from commissions off every wager made in these so-called "social casinos."

“Top Ill. Court Wary Of Claims Workers’ Comp Trumps BIPA” Law360.

September 23, 2021

Justices on Illinois' high court Thursday questioned whether holding that the state's workers' compensation law preempts claims for statutory damages under the Illinois biometric privacy statute would defeat the purpose of the privacy law altogether.  

“Vowing to Look ‘Closely’ at Billing, Judge Appoints Trimmed Leadership Team in Casino App Cases” Law.com.

September 23, 2021

U.S. District Judge Edward Davila, who emphasized the importance of diversity, said he would appoint a 14-lawyer plaintiff team on Thursday in lawsuits against Google, Apple and Facebook over their casino apps. Edelson partner Rafey Balabanian had reduced the size of the team and made it more diverse.

“ZoomInfo Must Face Proposed Ill. Class’s Privacy Suit” Law360.

September 22, 2021

An Illinois federal judge ruled on Wednesday that ZoomInfo must face proposed class action claims that it nonconsensually uses Illinois resident names and identities to advertise paid access to its full database, ruling the proposed lead plaintiff sufficiently stated a claim. Read more at: https://www.law360.com/articles/1424278/zoominfo-must-face-proposed-ill-class-s-privacy-suit?te_pk=4886eb46-940b-41fb-8838-a41b75db16eb&utm_source=user-alerts&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=tracked-entity-alert?copied=1

“Online Directory Can’t End Privacy Suit Over People Search” Law360.

September 22, 2021

An Illinois federal judge rejected online directory RocketReach's bid to escape proposed class claims that the company unlawfully used personal information to advertise its paid people search service, saying state privacy laws don't exempt the company's alleged conduct.  

“Tom Girardi’s Downfall Delivers Ethics Lessons for Lawyers” Bloomberg Law.

September 20, 2021

“Patient Asks 7th Circ. To Revive Google Data Disclosure Suit” Law360.

September 17, 2021

Seventh Circuit judges on Friday pushed a patient seeking to revive his lawsuit alleging his privacy was breached when Google received de-identified electronic health records from the University of Chicago Medical Center to point to factual allegations that his personal information was ever disclosed.  

“Girardi Saga Shows Why Calif. Attys Don’t ‘Snitch'” Law360.

September 8, 2021

Perkins Coie LLP attorneys posed a curious question during a presentation at a California legal conference in 2019: If the lawyer across the negotiation table is drunk and bragging about double-billing her clients, should you report her to the state bar?  

“Vaccine Mandate Tracker: The Law Firms Requiring Vaccination for Office Returns” Law.com.

September 7, 2021

Edelson PC: The firm is requiring that employees who come to the office be vaccinated, with  reasonable accommodations for those with medical exemptions.

“Clearview Can’t Use 1st Amendment To Beat Ill. Privacy Suit” Law360.

August 27, 2021

Clearview AI does not have a First Amendment right to escape liability under the nation's strictest biometric privacy law for scraping Illinois residents' online photos to build a searchable database, a state judge ruled Friday.  

“Ex-Girardi Attys’ Contempt Hearing Delayed For Now” Law360.

August 26, 2021

An Illinois federal judge on Thursday postponed a planned September contempt hearing for two former Girardi Keese attorneys accused of covering up a theft of $2 million in client settlement funds, citing a scheduling conflict caused by pandemic safety protocols for an upcoming jury trial.

“Notre Dame Football Hit With Latest Concussion Class Action” Law360.

August 26, 2021

The NCAA and University of Notre Dame let football players rack up brain injuries for decades while cynically downplaying the danger of concussions so they could cash in on their performances, according to a proposed class action filed Wednesday.  

“Girardi case inspires new legislation to rein in plaintiffs’ bar” Reuters.

August 24, 2021

A piece of legislation introduced in Illinois in the wake of litigation against high-profile attorney Tom Girardi would put plaintiffs’ lawyers under more scrutiny for the way they handle settlement money.

“7th Circ. Nixes Biometric Co.’s Bid To Arbitrate Privacy Claim” Law360.

August 11, 2021

A Seventh Circuit panel unanimously agreed Wednesday with a lower court's decision to reject biometric software company Onfido Inc.'s bid to send facial data privacy claims to arbitration.

“Girardi Says He Won’t Talk At Lion Air Contempt Hearing” Law360.

August 10, 2021

Thomas V. Girardi will refuse to testify in upcoming contempt proceedings for former Girardi Keese attorneys who are accused of helping him take their clients' settlement funds, telling a Chicago federal judge Monday that if he were called to the stand, he would invoke his constitutional right to remain silent.

“Google, Apple and Facebook Object to ‘Frankenstein’ Case Over Casino Apps” Law.com.

August 10, 2021

In lawsuits over casino-style apps brought separately against Google, Apple and Facebook, plaintiffs lawyers took a gamble: They wanted to consolidate the dozens of cases and appoint themselves as the leadership team. All three tech companies have agreed to parts of the plan but also objected to such a “Frankenstein proceeding.” In filings on Monday, the defendants raised concerns about sharing confidential information with their competitors, intermixing different legal theories and creating a bloated leadership team that could result in substantial attorney fees.

“Chase Can Arbitrate 2 More Small-Biz Customer PPP Suits” Law360.

August 10, 2021

Two of the last Paycheck Protection Program-related lawsuits still facing JPMorgan Chase Bank NA were bounced to arbitration on Tuesday after an Illinois federal judge upheld the bank's bid to invoke its account agreements with a pair of small businesses that sued it.  

“Girardi Ch. 7 Trustee Must Give Discovery In Contempt Fight” Law360.

July 26, 2021

An Illinois federal judge on Monday ordered the Girardi Keese law firm's bankruptcy trustee to hand over documents to two of the firm's ex-partners who say they need the information to defend themselves at a contempt hearing related to claims they covered up the alleged theft of $2 million in client settlement funds.

“Another Ga. Sterilization Plant Sued Over Chemical Emissions” Law360.

July 21, 2021

An Augusta, Georgia, medical equipment sterilization plant has been hit with claims from about two dozen nearby residents who say the facility has emitted large amounts of a cancer-causing chemical, ethylene oxide, into the city's air.

“Former Girardi Keese Lawyers Lose Bid to Toss Missing Money Suit” Bloomberg Law.

July 20, 2021

Former Girardi Keese attorneys David Lira and Keith Griffin lost their bids to dismiss a lawsuit brought by plaintiffs’ firm Edelson PC over allegedly embezzled Boeing settlement funds, after the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Illinois rejected their challenges to its jurisdiction.

“Ex-Girardi Keese Attys Can’t Duck Stolen Settlement Claims” Law360.

July 19, 2021

An Illinois federal judge refused Monday to toss Chicago firm Edelson PC's claims that two former Girardi Keese PC partners helped Tom Girardi steal settlement funds, ruling the court has jurisdiction over both California lawyers while agreeing to pause a portion of the litigation until the firm's bankruptcy case is resolved.  

“ADT Customers Reject Settlements, Want Class Cert.” Law360.

July 13, 2021

A group of ADT customers pushed for class certification on their claims that the security company is liable for a former technician's use of home cameras to invade their privacy, mostly arguing that their claims are closely related because they each had identical ADT systems in their homes.  

“Ex-Girardi Attys’ Contempt Hearing To Move Forward In Fall” Law360.

July 8, 2021

An Illinois federal judge on Thursday dismissed due process concerns and other issues raised by counsel for two former Girardi Keese PC attorneys accused of covering up the alleged theft of $2 million in client settlement funds, saying a contempt hearing on the matter will proceed in the fall.  

“SCOTUS Decision May Punt Consumer Privacy, Data Breach Class Actions to State Courts” Law.com.

June 29, 2021

Plaintiffs attorneys might be taking their consumer privacy and data breach class actions to state courts after the U.S. Supreme Court set a higher standard for injuries needed for standing in federal courts. On June 25, the court’s 5-4 majority in the TransUnion v. Ramirez case found that plaintiffs whose Fair Credit Reporting Act protections were violated didn’t show “concrete” injuries from those violations and so lacked standing to sue for damages in federal court.

“State court will be next frontier for consumer class actions under federal law” Reuters.

June 28, 2021

In a footnote in his dissent in the U.S. Supreme Court’s ruling on Friday in TransUnion LLC v. Ramirez, Justice Clarence Thomas played Cassandra.

“Justices Reinforce Spokeo Injury Bar With TransUnion Ruling” Law360.

June 25, 2021

The U.S. Supreme Court on Friday significantly chipped away at widespread uncertainty over what's needed to press statutory privacy claims post-Spokeo by providing more detail on what real-world injuries meet this bar, an outcome that's likely to result in narrower class definitions and more fights shifting to state courts.  

“Tom Girardi’s Conservatorship Made Permanent” Law360.

June 9, 2021

A Los Angeles judge on Wednesday placed disgraced trial attorney Thomas V. Girardi permanently under the care of his brother in conservatorship, despite claims the 81-year-old attorney is faking having Alzheimer's in order to insulate himself from allegations that he stole tens of millions of dollars from his own clients.  

“Walled Lake gambler sues online betting site: You rigged my Bruins hockey bet” Detroit Free Press.

June 7, 2021

Michigan Resident Ryan Cristman sues DraftKings over an unpaid bet. The sports betting company has a class action lawsuit filed against it over allegedly not paying its users what they're owed.

“Revised $1.6M Neiman Marcus Breach Deal Scores Final OK” Law360.

June 7, 2021

An Illinois federal judge gave her final blessing Friday to a revised $1.6 million settlement between Neiman Marcus and a class of consumers who sought to hold the luxury department store owner accountable following a 2013 data breach.  

“Will Voice Recognition Tech Be the Target of a New Wave of BIPA Complaints?” The Recorder.

June 3, 2021

A proposed privacy class action against McDonald’s Corp. over its drive-thru voice assistant could create new case law on voiceprint biometrics, but privacy attorneys say the customers bringing the case first have to prove that the fast food giant is using the artificial intelligence to identify customers. On Friday, McDonald’s counsel at Jones Day removed an Illinois Biometric Information Privacy Act (BIPA) suit against the company to the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Illinois. The lawsuit centers on McDonald’s voice recognition technology used in some of its drive-thrus and developed by Apprente, a San Francisco Bay Area startup McDonald’s acquired in 2019.

“7th Circ. Not Buying Bid To Arbitrate Ill. Biometric Claim” Law360.

May 27, 2021

The Seventh Circuit on Thursday seemed hesitant to accept a biometric software company's argument that it should be able to arbitrate privacy claims brought by the user of an online marketplace that employs its software.  

“$76M TCPA Deal’s Final Fund Distribution Is OK’d” Law360.

May 20, 2021

An Illinois federal judge on Thursday approved plans to pay class members the remaining funds they are owed from a $76 million deal resolving claims against Caribbean Cruise Line Inc. and others over an alleged robocall scheme promoting free cruises. U.S. District Judge Matthew Kennelly approved a plan that ensures settling class members, who have so far received only a partial $200 payment for their Telephone Consumer Protection Act claims, receive the rest of their payouts either in one lump sum or in installments that accommodate the settlement administrator's tax reporting obligations.  

“For widows, orphans cheated by Tom Girardi, ‘Real Housewives’ riches add to the pain” Los Angeles Times.

May 18, 2021

Within weeks of the crash of Lion Air Flight 610 off the coast of Indonesia, Tom Girardi’s men arrived in Jakarta knocking on the doors of the victims’ families. Mr. Girardi is one of the best attorneys in America, they told the newly widowed and orphaned in 2018. Sign up with him and you could get millions from the plane manufacturer Boeing. They handed out glossy booklets touting Girardi’s quarter-century of taking on airlines and plane manufacturers and the billions he had won for his clients.

“Tesla has been hit with a class-action lawsuit” Insider.

May 14, 2021

Tesla was hit with a class-action lawsuit on Thursday by a Solar Roof customer who says the company jacked up the price of his roof by more than $70,000 after he had signed contracts. The lawsuit, filed in a California court, is being led by Matthew Amans, an associate professor of clinical radiology at the University of California San Francisco.

“DraftKings Reneged On NHL Game Payout, Mich. Bettor Says” Law360.

May 13, 2021

A Michigan sports gambler hit DraftKings Inc. with a putative class action Wednesday claiming it wrongly refused to pay out his winnings after a National Hockey League favorite was incorrectly listed as an underdog. The suit filed in federal court comes just months after Michigan joined a growing number of states legalizing online sports wagers, a potentially fertile ground for litigation by disgruntled bettors.

“CDLB People” Chicago Daily Law Bulletin.

May 12, 2021

Edelson PC promoted Alexander “Alex” G. Tievsky and J. Eli Wade-Scott from associates to partner.

“The 2021 Elite Trial Lawyers Finalists” The National Law Journal.

May 12, 2021

The National Law Journal is pleased to announce the finalists for the 2021 Elite Trial Lawyers. The lawyers and law firms selected this year have demonstrated repeated success in cutting-edge work on behalf of plaintiffs over the last 18 months. They also possess a solid track record of client wins over the past three to five years.

“Judge Denies Stay For Biometric Data Vendor In BIPA Case” Law360.

April 29, 2021

An Illinois federal judge on Thursday rejected a bid from Kronos Inc. to pause a lawsuit accusing it of violating Illinois' landmark biometric privacy law pending two closely watched appellate cases, saying the timekeeping technology maker waited too long to request a stay.  

“Ex-Girardi Keese Attys Fight Push For Contempt Order” Law360.

April 28, 2021

Two ex-Girardi Keese PC attorneys have urged an Illinois federal court not to hold them in contempt for the firm's failure to follow a court order and issue settlement payments in plane crash litigation, arguing they can't be held liable for their former employer's actions.  

“TikTok Deal Worth a Cup of Coffee Rued as Too Puny” Bloomberg.

April 19, 2021

“At even half the claims rate as the Facebook deal, most class members will get $6 which is barely enough to purchase a coffee at Starbucks,” Andrews said. “If they have a 5% claims rate, which is highly probable here, many class members will maybe get enough to buy lunch.”

“Facebook Sued as Alleged Co-Conspirator to Social Casinos” Law Street.

April 19, 2021

Following suits against Apple and Google, three consumers filed a class-action complaint Friday in the Northern District of California against Facebook for its purported continued participation “in an illegal internet gambling enterprise.” The plaintiffs claimed that over the past 10 years, slot machine makers “have teamed up with American technology companies to develop a new product line: social casinos.” According to the complaint, social casinos “are apps, playable from smartphones, tablets, and internet browsers, that make the ‘authentic Vegas-style’ experience of slot machine gambling available to consumers anywhere and anytime.” The plaintiffs alleged that by moving casino games directly onto players’ devices and by using “an innocuous-sounding ‘free-to-play’ model, social casino companies, along with Facebook, Google, and Apple (the ‘Platforms’), have found a way to smuggle slot machines into the homes of consumers nationwide, twenty-four hours a day and three-hundred-sixty-five days a year.”

“Trustee Enlists Firm To Hunt Down Erika Girardi’s Valuables” Law360.

April 14, 2021

The bankruptcy trustee liquidating embattled attorney Tom Girardi's personal property is seeking to tap a Los Angeles law firm to hunt down money and valuables held by his wife, Erika, saying the "Real Housewives of Beverly Hills" star may have taken community property or given it to others.  

“Edelson Gets Mixed Bag In Bid To Depose Ex-Girardi Partners” Law360.

April 9, 2021

An Illinois federal judge Tuesday denied Edelson PC's bid to depose one former Girardi Keese partner in his bid to escape stolen settlement money claims, but the judge said he needs more time to decide whether another ex-partner's dismissal bid warrants a deposition. U.S. District Judge Matthew Kennelly said Edelson hasn't shown the court a need to depose former Girardi Keese PC partner Keith Griffin in the jurisdictional challenge he threw at the firm's claims that he helped founder Tom Girardi misappropriate $2 million in settlement funds. But the judge said more time is needed to determine whether former Girardi Keese partner David Lira properly invoked a California indemnification statute to avoid being deposed in his dismissal bid.  

“ADT Sued Over Allegations of Surreptitious Spying” Law Street.

April 5, 2021

On Friday,  a consumer filed a class-action complaint in the Southern District of Florida against ADT LLC doing business as ADT Security Services “based on its intentional and negligent tortious acts in providing security services to its customers with remote-viewing capabilities” and former employee Telesforo Aviles “for using those services to spy on Plaintiff and others who resided in homes with ADT security systems.”

“Titan Of The Plaintiffs Bar: Edelson’s Jay Edelson” Law360.

March 31, 2021

Jay Edelson, founder of Edelson PC, is known for cultivating an office culture that wouldn't feel foreign to employees of the technology companies he's made a career out of suing. Ping pong table in, suits out. So it's not lost on him that in 2020, a year studded with more than $2 billion in verdicts and settlements, he wasn't able to round up his staff in person. A record-making $650 million Facebook settlement and a headline-grabbing lawsuit accusing infamous California class action attorney Thomas Girardi of stealing from widows and orphans of a 2018 Boeing crash are just two of the highlights that earned him a spot on Law360's 2021 Titans of the Plaintiffs Bar list.  

“No, Lawyers Probably Aren’t Taking Our Marketing Agency Jobs Any Time Soon” Marketing Brew.

March 29, 2021

It’s not every day you see a legal firm bragging about its creative chops. But law firm Edelson PC has a “creative division” that churns out parodies, skits, and other content, per Ad Age.

“Law360 Reveals Titans Of The Plaintiffs Bar” Law360.

March 28, 2021

The group also includes Edelson PC founder and CEO Jay Edelson, who has gained a reputation over the years for taking big tech companies to court. One of these confrontations included a 2015 class action lawsuit against Facebook for allegedly collecting biometric data from its users without consent. In January 2020, Facebook agreed to pay a $650 million non-reversionary cash settlement, making it the largest consumer privacy class action deal ever, according to the firm. Read more at: https://www.law360.com/articles/1364443/law360-reveals-titans-of-the-plaintiffs-bar?copied=1

“This law firm acts like an ad agency” Crain’s Chicago Business

March 27, 2021

Edelson PC is a plaintiffs' law firm with an untraditional approach. This becomes clear once you see its casual dress code and graffiti-scrawled walls and

“Class Action Filed Against Google as Conspirator with Slot Machine Makers” Law Street.

March 26, 2021

On Thursday, consumers filed a class-action complaint in the Northern District of California against Google for hosting social casino phone apps, illegally profiting from gambling games, and being a co-conspirator with technology companies who developed the social casinos. According to the complaint, for about the last ten years, “the world’s leading slot machine makers – companies like International Game Technology, Scientific Games Corporation, and Aristocrat Leisure – have teamed up with American technology companies to develop a new product line: social casinos,” which are gambling apps that mimic the “‘Vegas-style’ experience” of slot machine gambling. The plaintiffs asserted that the social casino companies, “along with Google, Facebook, and Apple (the Platforms), have found a way to smuggle slot machines into the homes of consumers nationwide.” (Neither the slot machine makers nor Facebook and Apple are party to the lawsuit.)

“A Decade After the Milberg Weiss Scandal: Does History Repeat Itself?” New York Law Journal.

March 26, 2021

More than a decade after the Milberg Weiss scandal, plaintiffs’ firms are facing myriad challenges to maintain their revenue streams. In 2007, Milberg Weiss was investigated for giving individuals kickbacks, typically 10% of the fees earned by the firm in the action, so the firm could use them as named plaintiffs in its class actions. This scheme allowed Milberg to be first in the door to receive the largest share of the legal fees received in any case. After a seven-year investigation by federal prosecutors, four partners pled guilty to criminal charges and the firm entered into a non-prosecution agreement. At the time, the prosecutions appeared to be a bellwether of change for the legal profession. Yet years later, the plaintiffs’ bar is experiencing another growing threat. The recent proliferation of civil actions and criminal prosecutions involving alleged misconduct of plaintiffs’ counsel, ranging from the diversion of client funds to extortion in connection with settlement negotiations, is making the news. With the government again focusing on the behavior of the plaintiffs’ bar, its scrutiny could signal the emergence of a new prosecutorial priority with which plaintiffs’ firms, and the legal profession, will have to contend.

“PacifiCorp hit with two more wildfire lawsuits” Portland Business Journal.

March 11, 2021

PacifiCorp is facing more lawsuits stemming from last September’s devastating wildfires in Oregon.

The latest suits, filed in Marion County circuit court, are along the lines of earlier claims that the electric utility could have prevented the Beachie Creek fire that ravaged communities in the Santiam Canyon east of Salem.

In each of the two new suits, dozens of plaintiffs seek $750 million from the Berkshire Hathaway-owned company.

“Lawsuits seek over $1 billion from Pacific Power over Beachie Creek Fire” Statesman Journal.

March 10, 2021

Two lawsuits filed Wednesday ask for more than $1 billion in damages from Pacific Power claiming negligence for igniting wildfires in the Santiam Canyon, according to court records filed in Marion County.

The two lawsuits represent over 100 different people impacted by the Beachie Creek Fire.

The two law firms leading the effort, Edelson PC and Johnson Johnson Lucas and Middleton, say Pacific Power, doing businesses as PacifiCorp, "failed to safely design, operate, and maintain its infrastructure leading to the fire."

“Jay Edelson says TikTok settlement, Girardi bankruptcy show class action bar is ‘broken'” Reuters.

March 9, 2021

In the span of three months, Jay Edelson has helped upend the career of Tom Girardi, wrested $650 million from Facebook, and thrown a wrench into a planned $92 million settlement with TikTok. But Edelson says his ambition is bigger: He wants to reshape the class action system that’s made him and his Chicago law firm millions. Six years after The New York Times dubbed him “the most hated person in Silicon Valley,” Edelson is picking a fight on his own turf.

“The plaintiffs bar is broken,” said Edelson, whose 14-year-old firm, Edelson PC, made its name suing tech companies.

“Facebook’s $650M BIPA settlement ‘a make-or-break moment’” IAPP.

March 5, 2021

“There’s essentially been a schism within the privacy bar about how to approach large privacy cases where a large group of attorneys has entered into settlements with large numbers attached, but the class members really end up getting little to nothing,” Edelson said. “We’ve been very critical of this part of the plaintiff’s bar and really are hoping that the Facebook settlement is a wake-up call and that the people who claim to believe in privacy rights will actually prove that by making sure they litigate cases fully and get good settlements.”

“Judge Refuses to Approve $92M TikTok Privacy Class Action Settlement” Law.com

March 2, 2021

A federal judge on Tuesday declined to approve a $92 million class action settlement with TikTok Inc., raising several questions about the predicted claims rate and proposed notice plan. At a preliminary approval hearing, U.S. District Judge John Lee of the Northern District of Illinois wanted more information as to why class members would not receive notice of the settlement through TikTok’s own app, which might improve the predicted claims rate of less than 2%. “It seems only natural if a settlement is supposed to benefit TikTok users, notice though the app would be a natural way to provide them notice,” said Lee.

“Is a Mass Reckoning Coming for the Plaintiffs Bar?” National Law Journal.

February 28, 2021

Tom Girardi needed no introduction when stepping into a courtroom. Founding attorney of Los Angeles-based Girardi Keese, he made his name working on the environmental contamination case made famous from the 2000 film “Erin Brockovich” and took lead roles in numerous mass torts. He handled large numbers of cases over pharmaceutical drugs and for NFL players claiming concussion injuries. He has innumerable accolades for his professional successes: The National Law Journal’s annual Elite Trial Lawyers, president of the International Academy of Trial Lawyers and the State Bar of California’s Trial Lawyer Hall of Fame.

“Judge Approves Facebook’s $650M Privacy Settlement as ‘Major Win for Consumers'” Law.com.

February 26, 2021

A federal judge has given final approval to a $650 million class action settlement with Facebook, praising an “impressive claims rate” in a case that had “several complicated and intensely litigated issues.” In a Friday order, U.S. District Judge James Donato of the Northern District of California, who initially rejected preliminary approval of the settlement when it was worth $550 million, noted that each class member would get $345. “By any measure, the $650 million settlement in this biometric privacy class action is a landmark result,” wrote Donato. “Overall, the settlement is a major win for consumers in the hotly contested area of digital privacy.”

“Law Firm Busts Out Two New Rap Videos” Above The Law.

February 11, 2021

When Edelson PC created Edelson Creative to serve as a platform to “produce and host creative content generated by the firm and its artistic partners,” we expected to see some fun content coming out of the high-powered, iconoclastic plaintiffs’ firm. But with the pandemic and an election and a coup and two impeachments since we first wrote about the Creative, it’s been a while since we’ve checked in.

“Litigation Law Firm Drops Hamilton-inspired BigLaw Diss Track” Legal Cheek.

February 10, 2021

A US law firm has come up with a unique way of reminding aspiring lawyers that boutiques can offer top-notch work and experience just as well as the world’s biggest firms. Edelson PC dropped ‘BigLaw Refuted’ (above) this week, a parody of ‘Farmer Refuted’ from hit musical Hamilton. The animated short is set in the context of a law school careers fair where a BigLaw firm and Edelson have opposing stands. It begins with ‘BigLaw Guy’ taking aim at “the lawyers who preach revolution”, with some very witty lyrics.

“Lawyer Limelight: Jay Edelson” Lawdragon.

January 12, 2021

More than 2,500 years ago, Chinese military strategist Sun Tzu argued that the key to victory on the battlefield is knowing the enemy. Jay Edelson has taken that ancient wisdom a step further by learning from the enemy. The Chicago lawyer built his reputation and career suing tech legends – noting on his own Twitter bio that he may be the most hated man in Silicon Valley. Edelson nonetheless credits the industry for some of his successes. “One thing – which Silicon Valley gets – is to go where you think society is going and don’t worry immediately about what the financial implications are,” explains Edelson, who opened a new class-action firm just four years after earning his juris doctorate at University of Michigan Law.

“Cybersecurity & Privacy Group Of The Year: Edelson PC” Law360.

December 8, 2020

Edelson PC won initial approval of a $650 million cash settlement in a biometric privacy case against Facebook and retained a $925 million jury verdict against dietary supplement marketer ViSalus in an unauthorized robocall suit, landing it among Law360's 2020 Cybersecurity & Privacy Practice Groups of the Year. Four teams within the plaintiffs powerhouse of 32 attorneys and 25 other staffers work in collaboration when the Chicago- and San Francisco-based law firm takes on a major case, according to Eve-Lynn Rapp, an Edelson partner and co-chair of its public client team. The four teams focus on forensic investigation, litigation, appellate matters, and government legislation and enforcement, Rapp said.

“Class Action Group Of The Year: Edelson” Law360.

December 3, 2020

Edelson PC inked an unprecedented $650 million settlement with Facebook over biometric privacy violations, and snagged the highest-ever privacy verdict in a TCPA suit against marketing company ViSalus, earning the firm a spot among Law360's Class Action Groups of the Year. Edelson made history in May when it guided the largest consumer privacy settlement in U.S. history against Facebook over claims the social media giant used facial recognition technology without users' consent, in violation of the Illinois Biometric Information Privacy Act. The case was headed to a jury trial when the class struck a $550 million settlement for Facebook users, which was later increased to $650 million.

“Law Firm Sets Nov. 23 Deadline for Plaintiffs to Collect in Illinois Class Action vs. Facebook” AdWeek.

November 10, 2020

Some Facebook users in Illinois may have a little extra holiday shopping money coming their way. Law firm Edelson PC issued a reminder that users of the social network who are located in the state may be eligible for a slice of the $650 million settlement of a class-action suit against the company.

“Edelson Atty Tapped To Lead In Society Insurance MDL.” Law360.

October 21, 2020

A former Illinois state representative and current attorney at Edelson PC has been chosen by policyholders to fight their multidistrict litigation against Society Insurance Co. over COVID-19 business interruption coverage. Arthur Turner Jr., of counsel at Edelson's Chicago office, was designated as plaintiffs' liaison counsel by Society's policyholders on Tuesday. The attorney has represented plaintiffs in Biscuit Cafe Inc. et al. v. Society Insurance Inc. with other attorneys at Edelson.

“Plaintiffs’ lawyer Jay Edelson slams $380 million Equifax deal in amicus brief at 11th Circuit.” Thomson Reuters.

September 14, 2020

Jay Edelson is a class action plaintiffs’ lawyer who specializes in privacy cases. His eponymous firm has had a lead role in some of the biggest cases of the past few years, including a $650 million biometric privacy settlement with Facebook in 2020 and a 2019 jury verdict of more than $900 million in a Telephone Consumer Protection Act case against the telemarketer ViSalus. Edelson has a powerful interest, in other words, in the integrity of the class action system.

“Mobile Game Co. Huuuge Inks $6.5M Deal In Gambling Case.” Law360.

August 24, 2020

Huuuge Inc. has agreed to shell out $6.5 million to end a proposed class action claiming the smartphone casino game maker violated gambling and consumer protection laws, a deal that follows two years of litigation and a trip to the Ninth Circuit, according to a motion filed on Sunday. Specifically, Huuuge illegally charged users for chips in its smartphone app games, according to named plaintiff Sean Wilson's April 2018 suit. Huuuge's games include "Huuuge Casino," "Billionaire Casino" and "Stars Casino," according to the complaint.

“Facebook’s $650M Biometric Deal Gets Initial OK.” Law360.

August 21, 2020

A California federal judge preliminarily approved Facebook's revised $650 million biometric privacy settlement with a class of Illinois users after rejecting a previous $550 million version of the deal. In an eight-page Aug. 19 order, U.S. District Judge James Donato said the parties' revised deal addresses his "serious concerns" about their previous proposal, which the judge had criticized for being too small and having broad release provisions. "The revised settlement agreement and additional information presented by the parties have resolved the court's concerns," the order says. "Consequently, preliminary approval of the class action settlement is granted."

“ViSalus Can’t Get $925M Robocall Damages Award Cut Down.” Law360.

August 14, 2020

An Oregon federal judge on Friday refused to reduce a $925 million statutory damages award that health supplement marketer ViSalus is facing after a jury found it blasted consumers with nearly 2 million unsolicited robocalls, rejecting the company's argument that the penalty was unconstitutionally excessive. Noting that the Ninth Circuit has yet to address the issue of whether the Fifth Amendment's due process clause limits the aggregate statutory damages that can be awarded in a class action under the Telephone Consumer Protection Act, U.S. District Judge Michael Simon concluded that Congress' decision to allow for uncapped damages of at least $500 per violation under the statute was constitutionally valid and that the large aggregate number ViSalus is staring down "comes from simple arithmetic," given that a jury had found last year that the marketer had placed more than 1.8 million illegal calls.  

“Lessons Learned From the Year of the Virtual Summers.” The American Lawyer.

August 14, 2020

Some firms—although a fewer number—chose to go with full-length virtual programs. Plaintiffs firm Edelson carried out a full 10-weekonline program for nine summer associates. Firm chair Jay Edelson added that one of the benefits of being a smaller firm—the Chicago-based firm has about 50 attorneys spread across three offices—is that it can quickly make decisions, including adjusting its existing summer program to work in a new format.

“The Cybersecurity 202: Zoom sued by consumer group for misrepresenting its encryption protections.” The Washington Post.

August 11, 2020

A consumer advocacy group is suing Zoom and seeking millions of dollars in damages, accusing the company of misleading its users about the strength of its encryption protections. The nonprofit group Consumer Watchdog is also accusing the videoconferencing company of deceiving users about the extent of its links with China and the fact that some calls between people in North America were routed through servers in China. That raises the danger Beijing could steal or demand access to the contents of those calls, according to a copy of the lawsuit, which was shared exclusively with The Cybersecurity 202.

“Zoom Deceived Users About Privacy Protections, Suit Claims.” Law360.

August 11, 2020

Advocacy group Consumer Watchdog has hit Zoom Video Communications Inc. with a lawsuit in D.C. Superior Court, claiming the company falsely promised it was using end-to-end encryption to protect its users' communications in an effort to boost its brand amid the COVID-19 pandemic. Read more at: https://www.law360.com/articles/1300333/zoom-deceived-users-about-privacy-protections-suit-claims?te_pk=4886eb46-940b-41fb-8838-a41b75db16eb&utm_source=user-alerts&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=tracked-entity-alert?copied=1

“Former State Rep. Arthur Turner, Jr. joins Edelson law firm in Chicago.” Chicago Business Journal.

August 5, 2020

Arthur Turner, Jr., who represented Illinois’ 9th House District on the west side of Chicago for 10 years until July, has joined the Edelson law firm in Chicago.

Edelson said he'll primarily work alongside the firm’s litigation team. The firm said Turner will help direct Edelson’s nationwide Paycheck Protection Program litigation on behalf of small businesses and "work with the teams leading the firm’s college football concussion lawsuits, litigation protecting vulnerable communities and certain environmental matters."

“Small Businesses Press For Chase Virus Relief Loans MDL.” Law360.

July 30, 2020

Small businesses that have sought coronavirus relief loans through the Paycheck Protection Program urged a federal judicial panel on Thursday to consolidate their lawsuits accusing JPMorgan Chase Bank NA of mishandling their applications, cases the bank countered are dwindling in number and too distinct to combine.  

“Westlake Hospital owners to pay Melrose Park $1.5 million to settle dispute over controversial closure.” The Chicago Tribune.

July 27, 2020

After more than a year of battling in court, the owners of now-shuttered Westlake Hospital have agreed to pay Melrose Park $1.5 million under a settlement approved by the village board Monday.

The village sued Los Angeles-based Pipeline Health in Cook County Circuit Court in March of last year, after Pipeline said it would close Westlake. The village alleged Pipeline made misrepresentations when it bought Westlake by saying it would keep the hospital open, and then closing it weeks after the purchase.

“Facebook’s Upped $650M Biometric Deal Nears Initial OK.” Law360.

July 23, 2020

A California federal judge indicated Thursday he's inclined to preliminarily sign off on Facebook's revised $650 million biometric privacy settlement with a class of Illinois users, saying it's "incrementally better" than the one he rejected last month, while adding that he wants to see a "record-breaking claims rate."  

“CDLB People.” Chicago Daily Law Bulletin.

May 29, 2020

Edelson P.C. has added Éviealle Dawkins and Emily E. Penkowski as incoming associates. Dawkins’ practice will focus on consumer, privacy-related and tech-related class actions. Penkowski’s practice will focus on privacy- and tech-related class actions.

“A.C.L.U. Accuses Clearview AI of Privacy ‘Nightmare Scenario.’” The New York Times.

May 28, 2020

The American Civil Liberties Union on Thursday sued the facial recognition start-up Clearview AI, which has helped hundreds of law enforcement agencies use online photos to solve crimes, accusing the company of “unlawful, privacy-destroying surveillance activities.”

In a suit filed in Illinois, the A.C.L.U. said that Clearview violated a state law that forbids companies from using a resident’s fingerprints or face scans without consent. Under the law, residents have the right to sue companies for up to $5,000 per privacy violation.

“ACLU sues Clearview AI, developer of controversial facial recognition technology used by CPD.” Chicago Sun-Times.

May 28, 2020

The American Civil Liberties Union on Thursday filed suit in Cook County against Clearview AI, a New York-based startup that has developed a controversial facial recognition tool that allows users to compare an image against a database of billions of photos lifted from the internet.

The lawsuit against Clearview — which has provided its program to various public and private entities, including the Chicago Police Department — alleges the company continues to violate the Illinois Biometric Information Privacy Act, which protects residents’ facial and fingerprint identifiers.

“Clearview AI Sued by Civil Rights Groups Over Facial Recognition.” Bloomberg Law.

May 28, 2020

Clearview AI Inc. captures and stores the faceprints of millions of Illinois residents without permission, in violation of that state’s biometric privacy law, the American Civil Liberties Union and other advocacy groups are alleging in a state court lawsuit. The suit, filed on Thursday in Illinois Circuit Court, claims that the collection and use of images posted online, including on social media sites, breach the Biometric Information Privacy Act.

“Advocacy Orgs Say Clearview AI Broke Biometric Privacy Law.” Law360.

May 28, 2020

The American Civil Liberties Union and other advocacy groups hit Clearview AI Inc. with a lawsuit in Illinois state court Thursday claiming the facial recognition technology company has violated the biometric privacy rights of their members, program participants and other Illinois residents on a "staggering scale." In what they say is the first lawsuit addressing how vulnerable communities — including sex workers, sexual assault survivors and undocumented immigrants — are harmed by facial recognition surveillance, the organizations claim Clearview has used its technology to capture more than three billion face prints from images posted online without users consent, and in violation of Illinois' landmark Biometric Privacy Act. Read more at: https://www.law360.com/illinois/articles/1277681/advocacy-orgs-say-clearview-ai-broke-biometric-privacy-law?copied=1

“ADT Worker Allegedly Spied on Clients Via Cameras, Suit Says.” Bloomberg Law.

May 18, 2020

An ADT Inc. employee allegedly eavesdropped on hundreds of customers and children over a seven-year period through a home protection app, according to lawsuits that fault the company for poor oversight. Two plaintiffs have made common law privacy and contract claims, and one of them has alleged a violation of the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act, in separate lawsuits filed Monday in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Florida.

“Lurie Children’s sued over two recent data breaches.” Modern Healthcare.

May 8, 2020

The parent of a pediatric patient seen at Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago is suing the hospital over two recent data breaches.

An unnamed Jane Doe and her daughter, an unnamed Baby Doe, filed the complaint against Lurie Children's and two former employees accused of viewing thousands of patient records without a valid reason in the Circuit Court of Cook County on Friday. The plaintiffs, represented by law firm Edelson P.C., are seeking class action status.

“Lurie Children’s sued over patient information breach.” Chicago Sun-Times.

May 8, 2020

A mother is suing Lurie Children’s Hospital and two former employees who allegedly accessed the medical records of her 3-year-old daughter, who underwent a sexual abuse examination at the hospital early last year. The mother received a letter from the hospital in late December informing her a nursing assistant had been accessing her daughter’s medical records “without a work-related reason,” according to the lawsuit.

“Suit filed against Lurie Children’s Hospital over data breaches.” Chicago Tribune.

May 8, 2020

An Illinois mother and her 4-year-old child have filed suit against Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago and two unnamed employees, alleging the hospital failed to keep the daughter’s medical records safe. The lawsuit, filed in the Circuit Court of Cook County Friday, alleges breach of contract, breach of confidentiality, negligent supervision and other counts against Lurie Children’s Hospital. The lawsuit, which seeks class action status, asks for a jury trial.

“Coping With A Pandemic: Edelson’s Jay Edelson.” Law360.

April 30, 2020

With distancing and isolation the new norm amid the COVID-19 pandemic, Law360 is sharing reactions from around the business and legal community. Today's perspective comes from Chicago-based Jay Edelson, founder and CEO of Edelson PC and host of the Non-Compliant podcast.

“Feared Chicago class-action lawyer takes on Chase over PPP handling.” Crain’s Chicago Business.

April 26, 2020

A Chicago lawyer who’s wrung hundreds of millions in settlements from the country’s biggest technology companies is taking on another behemoth: JPMorgan Chase. Jay Edelson is representing the founder of west suburban Westchester-based Sha-Poppin Gourmet Popcorn, which alleges in a suit filed April 24 that Chase favored large corporations over small businesses like hers in securing federal aid through the Paycheck Protection Program.

“First on CNN Business: JPMorgan, Ruth’s Chris accused of cheating small businesses out of emergency loans.” CNN.

April 24, 2020

JPMorgan Chase, Ruth's Chris Steak House and others are being accused in a lawsuit of efforts to "cheat" small businesses out of federal stimulus funding. An Illinois popcorn seller hurt by the coronavirus pandemic alleges that JPMorgan Chase's "pampering of its prized clients" like Ruth's Chris caused it to receive far less Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) funding than needed, according to the lawsuit, which seeks class-action status and was filed in federal court in Illinois.

“PPP loans: Westchester small business owner leads class action lawsuit against Chase Bank.” ABC 7 Chicago.

April 24, 2020

Sha-Poppin' Gourmet Popcorn Shoppe is tucked into a strip mall at Roosevelt and Mannheim roads in Westchester. Its owner is now taking on a big bank. Sha-Poppin' Gourmet Popcorn Shoppe is tucked into a strip mall at Roosevelt and Mannheim roads in Westchester. Its owner is now taking on a big bank.

“Chicago Plaintiffs Firm’s Donations Help Local Restaurants, Businesses Fighting Virus.” The American Lawyer/Law.com.

April 16, 2020

A Chicago-based plaintiffs boutique has donated more than $119,000 to local businesses that are fighting the COVID-19 pandemic, at a time when most law firms are taking steps to bolster their own liquidity. The firm’s founder and CEO, prominent class action and privacy law litigator Jay Edelson, said he and his partners are able to give in part because firms such as his are conditioned to operating through times of financial uncertainty.

“Edelson P.C. ramps up community giving during pandemic.” Chicago Daily Law Bulletin.

March 27, 2020

The novel coronavirus has presented Americans with a slew of health, professional and economic challenges. For Jay Edelson, the founder and CEO of the unorthodox, tech-focused plaintiff’s firm Edelson P.C., it presents an opportunity for lawyers to give back. “My view is this is the biggest crisis we’re going to face in our generation,” Edelson said. “Our impulse here is to help the community. The Chicago community has allowed us to thrive, now we want to give back.”

“Facebook to Pay $550 Million to Settle Facial Recognition Suit.” The New York Times.

January 29, 2020

Facebook said on Wednesday that it had agreed to pay $550 million to settle a class-action lawsuit over its use of facial recognition technology in Illinois, giving privacy groups a major victory that again raised questions about the social network’s data-mining practices.

“Cybersecurity & Privacy Group Of The Year: Edelson.” Law360.

January 24, 2020

After Edelson PC defeated Facebook’s bid to block a multibillion-dollar class action over the company’s face-scanning practices from going to trial and secured a $925 million verdict in a rare jury trial over robocalls, the plaintiffs firm was named 2019 Cybersecurity & Privacy Practice Groups of the Year.  

“Consumer Protection Group Of The Year: Edelson.” Law360.

January 21, 2020

Edelson PC was named Consumer Protection Group of the Year by Law360 for wins including their record setting $925 million jury verdict.

“Law Firm Partner Drops Rap Video About Class Actions.” Above The Law.

December 13, 2019

The best diss track aimed at the Chamber of Commerce you'll hear today.

“DeVry Must Face Mo. Graduate’s False Ad Suit.” Law360.

October 9, 2019

A Missouri federal judge let most of a former DeVry University student’s claims stand in a suit alleging the for-profit school made false advertisements.

“Google, University of Chicago Face Revamped Health Privacy Suit.” Bloomberg Law.

October 3, 2019

An amended complaint filed in Dinerstein v. Google, LLC alleges that The University of Chicago violated federal and state health laws by selling patient data to Google to develop artificial intelligence products.

“Privacy/Data Breach: Edelson.” The National Law Journal .

September 27, 2019

The National Law Journal recognized Edelson PC as an Elite Trial Privacy Firm for their Ninth Circuit win in Patel v. Facebook. After oral argument by J. Aaron Lawson, the court affirmed in full the district court’s class certification order, and addressed a key issue of Article III standing.

“Consumer Protection: Edelson.” The National Law Journal.

September 27, 2019

The National Law Journal recognized Edelson PC as an Elite Trial Consumer Protection Firm based on their record setting $925 million jury verdict in Wakefield v. Visalus.

“Gaming Law: Edelson.” The National Law Journal.

September 27, 2019

The National Law Journal recognized Edelson PC as the only Elite Trial Firm doing Gaming Law for their work in Kater v. Churchill Downs. In a first-of-its-kind opinion, the Ninth Circuit ruled that mobile slot machine apps are illegal gambling under Washington law.

“Illinois Powerhouse: Edelson.” Law360.

September 3, 2019

Edelson PC, one of Law360's Illinois Powerhouses, has "built a reputation for deploying inventive legal strategies to combat significant public issues". The firm is "leading governmental entities to fight for their residents and has secured landmark victories on behalf of consumers."

“Ill. Powerhouses Sprout National Clout From Chicago Roots.” Law360.

September 2, 2019

Law360's annual Regional Powerhouse series recognized five Illinois law firms, including Edelson PC, for their accomplishments over the last year.

“Chemical Plant Emissions Caused Cancer, Ill. Residents Say.” Law360.

August 28, 2019

Four lawsuits were filed by Chicago-area residents alleging they developed cancer after inhaling ethylene oxide emitted by two companies' Illinois facilities.

“AMD Inks $12.1M Deal In Computer Chip False Ad Row.” Law360.

August 26, 2019

After four years of litigation, a proposed $12.1 million settlement deal with Advanced Micro Devices was reached by consumers.

“Lake County Joins Private Firms To Target Juul Over E-Cigarette Marketing To Teens.” CBS Chicago.

August 13, 2019

In a "first-of-its-kind legal action," the Lake County state's attorney filed a lawsuit with private firms against e-cigarette maker Juul. The suit accuses Juul of using deceptive marketing campaigns to get teens to become addicted to nicotine-aided e-cigarettes.

“9th Circ. Sends Facebook Face-Scan Class Action To Trial.” Law360.

August 8, 2019

The Ninth Circuit affirms class certification in a $30 billion suit alleging Facebook's face-scanning feature violates Illinois' Biometric Information Privacy Act.

“Judge says won’t let opioid defendants use slow federal process to ‘avoid litigating’ opioid claims in IL court.” Cook County Record.

July 17, 2019

U.S. District Judge Matthew Kennelly granted the request of the Illinois Public Risk Fund to send the their opioid lawsuit back to Cook County Circuit Court to avoid the "black hole" of the federal mass action in Ohio.

“Google and the University of Chicago Are Sued Over Data Sharing.” The New York Times.

June 26, 2019

The University of Chicago Medical Center and Google were sued in a class action lawsuit accusing the hospital of of sharing hundreds of thousands of patients’ records with Google.

“Google Pulled Medical Record ‘Heist’ With U Of Chicago: Suit.” Law360.

June 26, 2019

Following "the greatest heist of consumer medical records in history", a class action was filed against the University of Chicago Medical Center and Google LLC. The suit accuses the Medical Center of breaching its contract with patients and Google of interfering with that contract.

“Genetic Testing Co. Can’t Limit Damages In Privacy Suit.” Law360.

June 24, 2019

An Alaska federal judge declined to limit a consumer's potential damages to $5,000 in a suit accusing Gene by Gene Ltd. of sharing customer's information without permission.

“Facebook Fights $30 Billion Privacy Suit at Ninth Circuit.” Courthouse News Service.

June 12, 2019

In an attempt to strike down a $30 billion class action, Facebook asked the Ninth Circuit to overturn U.S. District Judge James Donato's decision to grant class certification and deny Facebook's motion to dismiss in a suit claiming that facial data was harvested without user consent.

“Wiretap Suit Against Chinese Sex Toy Maker Survives.” Law360.

May 16, 2019

A California federal court pushed forward a class action claiming Hytto Ltd. illegally harvested data from its users, finding that vibration intensity settings are "content" under wiretapping law. U.S. District Judge Jeffrey White also dismissed the Chinese company's claim that the California court did not have jurisdiction in the case.

“Legal fight over fate of Westlake Hospital draws in unusual players, in ‘complex, complicated’ court fight.” Cook County Record.

May 10, 2019

The battle to keep Westlake Hospital open has become “one of the most complicated hospital closure disputes in [Illinois'] history.” The lawsuit brought by Melrose Park and their attorneys from Edelson PC has drawn in “multiple parties” including Cook County State’s Attorney Kim Foxx and Governor JB Pritzker.

“Cook County State’s Attorney Joins Fight to Keep Westlake Hospital Open.” Chicago Sun-Times.

April 19, 2019

Cook County State’s Attorney Kim Foxx filed an emergency motion to join Melrose Park in their fight to keep Westlake Hospital Open. The motion filed in Cook County Circuit Court seeks a temporary restraining order against Pipeline Health to prevent them from winding down services at Westlake. Foxx also filed an emergency motion asking permission to intervene as a plaintiff in the case, declaring Pipeline violated the Health Facilities Planning Act.

“In Rebuke, Judge Orders Westlake Hospital to Bring Back Obstetrics and Intensive Care Services.” Chicago Tribune.

April 16, 2019

A Cook County Circuit Court Judge found Pipeline Health to be in indirect civil contempt after violating an April 9th temporary restraining order prohibiting them from winding down Westlake Hospital’s operations. Pipeline was ordered to restore services to the intensive care, obstetrics and mental health units. The hospital was also instructed to accept ambulances in their emergency department. If services are not restored, Pipeline will have to pay $200,000 for every day it is out of compliance.

“Robocall Damages Against Marketer Could Hit $925M.” Law360.

April 14, 2019

After three days of trial, an Oregon federal jury concluded ViSalus made more than 1.8 million robocalls to class members, in violation of the Telephone Consumer Protection Act. The $925 million jury verdict is the “largest privacy verdict in history”.

“Big Tech Vs. Big Privacy Lawsuits.” Fortune.

February 23, 2019

Jay Edelson grew up poor among rich kids outside Boston. He seethes at the recollection of other boys smashing their $200 tennis rackets he could not afford, and of his parents scolding him for trying to spend the $20 he had earned raking leaves.

“Cybersecurity & Privacy Group Of The Year: Edelson.” Law360.

January 22, 2019

Edelson PC pursued headline-grabbing privacy suits in 2018 — suing Uber over a data breach, assisting a state regulator in a case against Facebook and Cambridge Analytica and winning class certification in a case claiming Facebook violated Illinois’ Biometric Information Privacy Act — landing it among Law360’s Cybersecurity & Privacy Groups of the Year.

“Volleyball Players Win Cert. In Sex Abuse Cover-Up Suit.” Law360.

January 18, 2019

Edelson PC was awarded class certification in a first-of-its-kind lawsuit against one of the most prominent youth volleyball clubs in the country for concealing and failing to disclose the club owner’s alleged sexual abuse of underage players.

“Meet the Managing Partner: Rafey Balabanian.” Law Practice Today.

January 14, 2019

Rafey S. Balabanian is the managing partner and general counsel at Edelson PC. He graduated with distinction with a degree in history from the University of Colorado, Boulder and earned his J.D. from the DePaul University College of Law in Chicago. Rafey is a trial lawyer who handles class and mass actions, as well as complex commercial and business litigation.

“Edelson PC Hosts Educational Seminar on ISBA’s High School Mock Trial Invitational.” Illinois State Bar Association.

December 7, 2018

Edelson PC hosted a seminar for over 40 south suburban Cook County high school students in preparation for the Illinois State Bar Association's High School Mock Trial Invitational. Cook County State’s Attorney Kim Foxx spoke at the event.

“Consumer Protection Group Of The Year: Edelson PC.” Law360.

January 16, 2018

Edelson PC defended consumers against everything from unwanted robocalls to nosy sex toys over the last year, with more than $130 million in settlements demonstrating why the firm was named among Law360's Consumer Protection Practice Groups of the Year.

“The Data Defenders: How Firms Focused on Privacy and Security Make Their Living.” Law.com.

December 11, 2017

“Noted class action lawyer Edelson calls for big litigation to cure opioid epidemic, make ‘big pharma’ pay.” Cook County Record.

December 9, 2017

Asserting Congress and local governments either aren't doing enough or lack the resources to address the so-called opioid epidemic impacting communities of all kinds and sizes, the only way to effectively fund treatment and solutions is through litigation, a Chicago class-action attorney said.

“Opioid Suits Are The New Tobacco Litigation, Atty Says.” Law360.

December 6, 2017

The litigation coming out of the opioid crisis will rival the tobacco suits of the 1990s, Jay Edelson of plaintiffs firm Edelson PC told an audience during a Chicago City Club panel on the drugs and possible solutions to the epidemic of addiction.

“Chicago Sues Uber Over Data Breach.” MediaPost.

November 28, 2017

The City of Chicago and Cook County tapped privacy lawyer Jay Edelson to serve as special prosecuting counsel in case against Uber over revelations that the company attempted to cover up a 2016 data breach that exposed personal information of 57 million people.

“More than 80 Harvey-related lawsuits have piled up as judges vet lawyers.” Houston Chronicle.

November 2, 2017

Jay Edelson, a Chicago lawyer who was the first of several Wednesday to present his leadership proposal to the judges, said afterward that the nearly five-hour session stood out in terms of productivity. The vetting hearings are usually spent with lawyers touting their credentials, but in this instance he said the court cut to the chase.

“Trump Election Commissioner’s Voter Database Is a Ripe Target for Hackers.” Mother Jones.

October 23, 2017

Kris Kobach calls the program a model for the country. It has major security problems.

“Spokeo lawsuit highlights challenge of protecting privacy in digital age.” Los Angeles Times.

August 29, 2017

For anyone who feels powerless about controlling their personal information in a world of search engines and public databases, take heart. A recent court ruling suggests you might have more muscle than you thought.

“PayPal Redirects Charitable Contributions Without Consent, Lawsuit Says.” The New York Times.

March 1, 2017

Class action alleges that thousands of donors have been misled by PayPal Giving Fund, and that their gifts never reached the intended charities.

“Q&A: Why Class Action Reform Bill Isn’t as Bad as It Seems.” The National Law Journal.

February 17, 2017

One of the most expansive bills to target class actions in the past decade quietly passed through the House Judiciary Committee this week, prompting plaintiffs attorneys, civil rights groups and consumer advocates to spring into action.

Facing a Data Breach Suit Without the Data Breach? ‘Scary.’ The American Lawyer.

December 13, 2016

With a track record of winning cases against some of the country’s biggest tech companies, and expanding liability for data privacy blunders in the process, Edelson is a difficult lawyer to bet against.

“Chicago Law Firm Accused of Lax Data Security in Lawsuit.” Bloomberg Law.

December 9, 2016

A federal judge on Friday unveiled a long sealed proposed class-action complaint that accused the law firm, Johnson & Bell, of failing to take adequate steps to protect the data on its servers.

“Maneuver in receipt privacy class action earns AllSaints $58K sanction from federal judge.” Cook County Record.

December 8, 2016

Retail clothier failed to persuade a federal judge to dismiss a class action lawsuit and has been stuck with a bill for $58,000 for its opponents’ legal costs, as the federal judge sent the case back to Cook County for further proceedings.

“Prominent class action firm sues ‘professional objectors’ for racketeering.” Reuters.

December 5, 2016

Edelson files suit against notorious class action objectors alleging that they are engaging in an ongoing scheme to extort class action lawyers via frivolous objections to proposed settlements.

“The Privacy Advisor Podcast: Jay Edelson.” iapp.

October 31, 2016

Jay Edelson is now one of best-known lawyers in the field, in part because of his aggressive pursuit of giant tech firms and their uses of consumer data.

“Modernizing Vs. Weakening The TCPA.” Law360.

September 30, 2016

The FCC and our judicial system have provided a comprehensive process to update the TCPA and keep it current with ever changing technology. Any changes at the congressional level should be done carefully and in a nuanced fashion to avoid opening sought-after loopholes that have unintended consequences.

“Edelson Firm Turns Back Spokeo Defense in Case against Gannett.” Legal Newsline.

September 14, 2016

Months after a U.S. Supreme Court ruling said those who bring lawsuits must show a "concrete and particularized" harm, the plaintiffs attorneys involved have defeated a defense attempting to use that ruling in another case. A judge ruled this month that providing personally identifiable information to a third party obtained from app users' viewing data can cause the users harm.

“Lawsuit Claims Smartphone-Enabled Massage Device Violated Privacy.” Chicago Tribune.

September 13, 2016

A Chicago-area woman is suing the maker of We-Vibe, claiming the smartphone-enabled personal massager secretly transmitted "highly intimate and sensitive data" of her usage to the company in real time. The lawsuit, filed this month in a Chicago federal court, seeks class-action status for "tens of thousands" of We-Vibe users, whose data allegedly was collected without consent by Standard Innovation, the device's Canadian manufacturer, in violation of privacy and consumer fraud laws.

“Cruise Cos. Settle Robocall Class Action For Up To $76M.” Law360.

September 8, 2016

Attorneys litigating a massive class action accusing several cruise marketing companies of violating the Telephone Consumer Protection Act by robocalling millions of Americans with offers for free trips told an Illinois federal judge overseeing the case Thursday that they had reached a settlement that could see the companies paying out up to $76 million.

“Gannett Can’t Escape Privacy Suit Over USA Today App.” Law360.

September 2, 2016

A Massachusetts federal judge won't let USA Today parent company Gannett Co. off the hook for allegedly collecting app users' video viewing data and sharing it with another company, ruling on Friday that disclosing personally identifiable information could indeed cause users harm.

“Mic Check: Suit Says Warriors App Uses Phone to Listen In on Fans.” Law.com

August 30, 2016

That’s the claim that lawyers at Edelson P.C. have made in a suit filed in San Francisco federal court on Monday against the San Francisco Bay Area’s National Basketball Association franchise and two companies that helped the team build its mobile app.

“Law Firms and Data Breaches: Sensitive Data and Dangerous Practices.” Junto.

August 23, 2016

A Q&A with Jay Edelson of Edelson PC Hacking incidents at law firms have led to major data breach events in recent months. Even as all law firms store and handle sensitive client data, many of the smaller organizations tend to lack robust cybersecurity policies and procedures.

Better with Age: Chicago’s Top Ten Startup Founders over 40

August 8, 2016

"Jay Edelson is the founder & CEO of 50-employee Chicago-based Edelson PC. Picture a stereotypical startup – workers scurrying about on hover boards throughout an open office, playing ping-pong, making music videos to team-build, playing around with the Oculus Rift, wearing flip-flops and short or jeans and hoodies as weather-appropriate, being entrepreneurial at every turn – and that’s Edelson . . . ."

“Cravath Alternative: $150K Now… Much, Much More At Bonus Time.” Above The Law.

June 27, 2016

"For a Biglaw player, there’s really no excuse at this point for lagging behind the market in compensation. It’s just throwing up a white flag to be hemming and hawing about compensation — at least in the top markets — at this point. . . ."  

“Panama Papers Fallout: What If Your Lawyer Gets Hacked?” InformationWeek.

May 31, 2016

"Your company has likely spent a lot of time, effort, and money keeping its security systems, policies, and practices up to date. Can the same be said of your law firm?

The legal industry isn't exactly known for its technology leadership, which should be of concern, especially from a security perspective. Don't assume that your data is safe, in other words. Be prepared to do your own due diligence. . . ."

“High Court Gets It Right With ‘Spokeo’ Decision.” The National Law Journal

May 31, 2016

"In Spokeo v. Robins, in which we represented the plaintiff, Spokeo Inc. made the unprecedented argument to the U.S. Supreme Court that to establish "injury in fact" standing in statutory cases, the plaintiff must allege "real-world" or "palpable" harm beyond the statutory violation. Not only did Spokeo's argument fail to secure five votes, it didn't garner any. . . ."

“Peter Thiel Proves Silicon Valley Only Hates Lawsuits When It’s the One Getting Sued.” Quartz.

May 27, 2016

"Silicon Valley purports to hate the legal system. To hear the tech world tell it, lawyers are leeches and regulations are mostly outdated. Lawsuits stifle innovation and waste money that startups could better spend developing products and recruiting more users, thereby making the world a better place. . . ."

“Trump’s Wall Misses the Mark: We Need a Cyber Wall, Not a Physical One.” TechCrunch.

May 27, 2016

"The issues for the general election campaign have, to a great extent, already been framed. And Donald Trump, being the world-class marketer he is, has successfully forced a debate about whether the U.S. needs to build a wall across the 1,954 miles of our southern border to secure our great nation. . . ."

“Tech Companies Take Their Legislative Concerns to the States.” The New York Times.

May 27, 2016

"The Biometric Information Privacy Act of Illinois is not a law many are familiar with. But if you have ever shared a photo on social media, the little-known statute turns out to be one of the nation’s toughest regulations for how companies like Facebook and Google can use facial recognition technologies to identify you online. . . ."

“Six Concussion Suits Are Filed Against Colleges and N.C.A.A.” The New York Times

May 17, 2016

Several former college football players filed class-action lawsuits Tuesday against their universities, conferences and the N.C.A.A., claiming negligence over their handling of head injuries. The spate of cases — six were filed Tuesday — marks a new effort by athletes seeking financial relief for what they say are the lasting effects from concussions sustained in their college careers. . . .

“Supreme Court Rules Spokeo Not Done with Privacy Lawsuit.” CNET.

May 16, 2016

The US Supreme Court kicked a contentious privacy lawsuit back to a lower court on Monday, essentially telling the 9th US District Court of Appeals it hadn't answered all the necessary questions when ruling that people search engine Spokeo had harmed a user by displaying inaccurate information. . . .

“Class-Action Suit Targeting Law Firm Privacy Protections Could Be Unsealed.” BloombergBNA.

May 5, 2016

Edelson PC announces it has filed a federal class-action under seal that targets a Chicago-based regional law firm for data security holes, and that it's moving the Court to unseal the complaint against the unnamed firm. . . .

“Theranos Exposes the Perverse Incentives at Work in Silicon Valley.” Quartz.

April 29, 2016

"Theranos, the health technology company once valued at $9 billion, is making its investors’ blood run cold... While the rise and fall of Theranos has been dramatic, it is far from a rare case. . . ."

“Michigan is about to let more of your privacy go to data miners.” MLive.

April 20, 2016

Silicon Valley hates privacy laws. And it's no surprise why. Companies like Facebook, Google and Instagram succeed by collecting and monetizing consumer data . . .

“Breaking Down the Class Action Lawsuit Against Kanye & TIDAL Over ‘Life of Pablo’ Release.” DJBooth.

April 18, 2016

Much of the discussion around the release of Kanye West's The Life of Pablo album has centered around its ground-breaking nature and constantly evolving musical updates, but underneath the art a different story has been unfolding. . . .

“Meet the Man Disrupting Silicon Valley.” Chicago Lawyer Magazine.

April 4, 2016

He’s seen Silicon Valley’s vision for the future, and it’s enough to keep him awake at night. If the tech wizards get their way, says Chicago attorney Jay Edelson, we will soon be living in a world of total interconnectivity. . . .

“Local Counsel May Be Weak Point in Big Law’s Cyberdefense.” The American Lawyer.

March 31, 2016

As big law firms come to grips with the need to defend against cyberattacks, some may not be doing enough to address a potential blind spot: other law firms. . . .

“Threats of Litigation After Data Breaches at Major Law Firms.” Bloomberg BNA.

March 30, 2016

Reports on Wednesday that both Weil Gotshal & Manges and Cravath, Swaine & Moore as well as other firms have suffered data breaches in recent months, put new attention on the potential consequences for law firms with lax security.

“We’ve been saying for a long time that law firms are major targets,” said Jay Edelson, founder of Edelson, a plaintiff’s side class-action firm that focuses on privacy-related suits. . . .

“Apple demands to know how FBI cracked San Bernardino iPhone.” TechRepublic.

March 30, 2016

On Monday, the Justice Department dropped its case against Apple after it was able to unlock the iPhone used by San Bernardino shooter, Syed Farook, with the help of an "outside party." Now, Apple wants to know just how they did it. . . .

“The FBI has a big ulterior motive in its fight against Apple.” Quartz.

March 18, 2016

When a public interest group wants to create new legal precedent, its first step is to find a client with sympathetic facts. But the public may not realize that the government employs this legal tactic as well. . . .

“Data Vampires.” pivot.

March 10, 2016

A diverse group of civil liberties advocates come together to battle data vampires, little known corporate entities that gather and manipulate people's personal information in an effort to influence consumer behavior with startling specificity. . . .

“Commentary: Why Apple is right to tangle with the FBI.” Chicago Tribune.

February 24, 2016

For the past decade I've spent my professional life fighting tech giants over consumer privacy issues. I've been called Silicon Valley's "most feared and loathed" attorney, "tech's baby-faced boogeyman" and — my personal favorite — a "leech tarted up as a freedom fighter." Given that, I never thought I would be standing with Apple in a high-stakes privacy battle. . . .

“Strategy To End Class Actions Might Just Wind Up Costing Companies More.” Forbes.

January 25, 2016

The U.S. Supreme Court’s decision in Campbell-Ewald v. Gomez seemed to leave open the possibility companies could pay off the representative plaintiff in a class action and thus stop the larger lawsuit before it begins...

Even if a defendant company convinces a judge to accept payment on behalf of a plaintiff who doesn’t want it, attorney Jay Edelson with Edelson PC in Chicago said the strategy ultimately is doomed to fail. . . .

“Pick-Offs After Campbell-Ewald: Some Predictions.” Law360.

January 21, 2016

On Wednesday, the U.S. Supreme Court rightly rejected Campbell-Ewald Co.’s attempt to settle out plaintiff Jose Gomez’s individual claim to, in Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s words, “avoid a potential adverse decision, one that would expose it to damages a thousand-fold larger than the bid Gomez declined to accept.” . . .

“Facial Recognition: Who’s Tracking You in Public?” Consumer Reports.

December 30, 2015

The mall is crowded, including the department store that keeps your family supplied with everything from handbags to business suits. Moments after you enter, a saleswoman walks up holding a tablet. She smiles and greets you by name. Are you shopping for yourself or your spouse today? We’ve moved things around since you were here in December—let me help you find your way, she says. . . .

“Plaintiffs Firm Edelson Brings Privacy Prowess To SF.” Law360.

November 4, 2015

Plaintiffs class action firm and privacy litigation heavyweight Edelson PC revealed Tuesday that it has set up shop in San Francisco, a move that the Chicago-based firm said would allow it to file more suits and put more pressure on Silicon Valley companies. . . .

“Privacy Class Action Firm Opens SF Office.” The Recorder.

November 3, 2015

Edelson PC, the Chicago-based plaintiffs firm that specializes in privacy litigation, will open its second office Tuesday in San Francisco. The new South of Market digs will put Edelson closer to key federal courts—and to the technology companies the firm frequently torments with class actions. . . .

“Supreme Court Case Pits Privacy Rights Against Internet Data Brokers.” Los Angeles Times.

November 2, 2015

The Supreme Court is set to hear a clash between privacy laws that protect American consumers and the desire of online data providers to avoid potentially crippling lawsuits if they post inaccurate information on the Web. . . .

“Disputed Web Profile Gives U.S. High Court Chance to Curb Suits.” Bloomberg.

November 2, 2015

Thomas Robins says the online profile he found under his name six years ago bore little resemblance to his real self...

That dossier, compiled by the data broker Spokeo Inc., is now at the center of what may be the biggest business case of the U.S. Supreme Court’s nine-month term. . . .

“Yelp-For-People App Raises Questions.” MediaPost.

October 2, 2015

On Wednesday, the Washington Post introduced the world to the forthcoming app Peeple, which will let people publicly post ratings about other people.

Since then, the concept of a Yelp-for-people has proven almost universally unpopular with observers, who are warning that Peeple will inevitably lead to abuse. . . .

“Twitter Hit With Suit Claiming It Snoops on Direct Messages.” The Wall Street Journal.

September 15, 2015

On Wednesday, the Washington Post introduced the world to the forthcoming app Peeple, which will let people publicly post ratings about other people.

Since then, the concept of a Yelp-for-people has proven almost universally unpopular with observers, who are warning that Peeple will inevitably lead to abuse. . . .

“White House Supports Consumers’ Right To Sue Data Brokers.” MediaPost.

September 11, 2015

Joining a roster of privacy advocates, the Obama administration is urging the Supreme Court to rule that consumers have the right to sue data aggregators for posting incorrect information online. . . .

“Class Actions And The Separation Of Powers: A Spokeo Debate.” Reuters.

September 1, 2015

Today is one of those days when I am really glad not to be a justice of the U.S. Supreme Court. They only get the tough cases. . . .

“The Rise and Fall of a Bitcoin Kingpin.” Rolling Stone.

August 27, 2015

Just after sunrise on August 1st, Tokyo police stormed into a sleek two-story townhouse on a quiet residential street in Japan's capital and arrested Mark Karpeles, the 30-year-old head of Mt. Gox, the largest bitcoin exchange in the world. . . .

“Edelson Adds Cybercrime Prosecutor.” Chicago Daily Law Bulletin.

August 26, 2015

The next time Edelson P.C. takes a tech foe to court, the firm will have a former cybercrime prosecutor on its side. . . .

“Chicago Law Firm Adds Staff To Fight Facebook (And Others Over Privacy).” Crain’s.

August 25, 2015

A Chicago law firm known for suing Facebook, Google and other tech giants is expanding its roster of lawyers by nearly half to tackle a booming caseload. . . .

“Facebook Readies for Battle Over Biometrics” The Recorder.

August 19, 2015

Three suits accuse its tagging feature of violating an Illinois law that carries hefty statutory penalties. . . .

“Autodialers on High Alert Over FCC Ruling.” Direct Marketing News.

July 29, 2015

Marketers who use text messages and automated phone calls are fretting that the Federal Communications Commission's recent order interpreting the Telephone Consumer Protection Act of 1991 (TCPA) will hurt consumers more than it will help them. Two trade associations have filed petitions in appeals court challenging the ruling, and corporate defense attorneys fear an increase in class action lawsuits. . . .

“Class Action Suits Question Who Owns Pics Posted on Social Media.” Claims Journal.

July 16, 2015

Facebook’s handling of your headshot is now the subject of class action lawsuits that pose the question: When someone turns your mug into data, are those digits theirs or yours? . . .

“Media, tech companies ask SCOTUS to restrict class actions in Spokeo.” Reuters.

July 15, 2015

It would have been shocking if big business hadn’t turned out in force to back the search engine Spokeo at the U.S. Supreme Court, in a case with potentially huge consequences for class action defendants. . . .

“Tech industry wants your face, but not your permission.” Deutsche Welle.

June 17, 2015

Discussions between privacy advocates and tech companies about facial recognition technology have broken down. The industry would not commit itself to obtaining users' consent before collecting their biometric data. . . .

“Facial recognition technology is everywhere. It may not be legal.” The Washington Post.

June 11, 2015

Privacy advocates and representatives from companies like Facebook and Google are meeting in Washington on Thursday to try to set rules for how companies should use this powerful technology. They may be forgetting that a good deal of it could already be illegal. . . .

“‘Internet of Things’ Could Drive Litigation Uptick.” New Jersey Law Journal.

June 11, 2015

Lax security for the growing number of appliances, televisions, cars and other everyday items connected to the Internet will prompt a wave of litigation in coming years, some lawyers have predicted. . . .

“NCPA: Lead plaintiff in NCAA concussion case opposes settlement.” CBS Sports.

June 9, 2015

The lead plaintiff in the NCAA’s concussion lawsuit says he never agreed to a preliminary settlement before a federal judge and has fired his lawyer, according to a statement released Tuesday by the National College Players Association. . . .

“Panel Sees More Data Breach Litigation on the Horizon.” The Legal Intelligencer.

June 3, 2015

A panel of national data-security attorneys agreed at a cybersecurity conference Tuesday that data breach litigation is expanding in almost every way, and big changes are coming soon. . . .

“The Key To Hiring The Best Summer Associates.” Law360.

May 26, 2015

A law firm’s summer associate program can be a great way for both firms and attorneys-in-training to figure out whether they have a future together, but it's still easy to be wrong.

Law firms will soon be struggling to find top talent in the avalanche of resumes they receive for summer associate positions, but law firms first need to ask some tough questions of themselves, experts say. . . .

“The Legal Power of ‘Standing’.” The New York Times.

May 14, 2015

It just goes to show the importance of jurisdiction. Recently, the Supreme Court added a new case to its docket for next year, Spokeo v. Robins, which is about a technical question of jurisdiction — when a plaintiff has “standing” to sue in federal court. . . .

“Filing: NFL concussion settlement shows NCAA deal can’t be approved.” CBS Sports.

May 12, 2015

A federal judge's recent approval of the NFL's concussion settlement demonstrates why the NCAA's proposed concussion deal “falls far outside the range of possible approval,” lawyers for a former San Diego State football player claim. . . .

“Supreme Court to Hear ‘Non-Injury’ Privacy Class Action.” E-Commerce Times.

May 6, 2015

The U.S. Supreme Court last month granted a request from Spokeo, a data aggregator, to consider whether the legal basis litigants must meet to file a claim in federal court should be broadly or narrowly defined. . . .

“Athletes’ Attorney Slams New NCAA Concussion Deal As ‘Window Dressing.’” CBS Chicago.

April 17, 2015

Attorneys representing college athletes in a concussion lawsuit against the NCAA have criticized a proposed settlement. . . .

“Surf, Cry, Sue: Tort lawyers could burst class-action floodgates unless High Court acts.” The Wall Street Journal.

April 16, 2015

Trial lawyers have built an empire chasing the potentially injured and convincing them to sue. But what if a multimillion-dollar lawsuit required no injury at all? . . .

“Facebook Hit With Lawsuit for Scanning, Storing Users’ Facial Data.” Newsweek.

April 7, 2015

Have you ever uploaded pictures onto Facebook and found that the site has automatically identified the people in each image, asking if you’d like to tag them?

This “tag suggestion” feature comes courtesy of the site’s facial recognition software, added in 2010, which a class-action lawsuit filed April 1 says violates users’ privacy. . . .

“Jay Edelson, the Class-Action Lawyer Who May Be Tech’s Least Friended Man.” The New York Times.

April 4, 2015

When technology executives imagine the boogeyman, they see a baby-face guy in wire-rim glasses. His name is Jay Edelson.

“Titan Of The Plaintiffs Bar: Jay Edelson.” Law360.

October 1, 2014

While working as a defense attorney in the late 1990s, Jay Edelson realized something was missing. So he built a plaintiffs' firm that offered just what he was craving. . . .

Let the Externs Get Paid

March 6, 2014

Last month the American Bar Association’s (ABA) Section of Legal Education Standards Review Committee recommended that the organization reverse its policy forbidding law students from being paid to participate in for-credit externships. That’s good news both for law students and our profession as a whole. . . .

“Plaintiff Seeks to Freeze Mt. Goxs’ U.S. Assets.” The New York Times.

March 5, 2014

Customers of Mt. Gox are trying to freeze assets in the United States of the bankrupt Bitcoin exchange and its chief executive, Mark Karpeles. There’s just one problem: They don’t know where those assets are.

Plaintiffs in a class-action lawsuit filed a motion on Tuesday seeking a temporary injunction to keep Mr. Karpeles or his company from moving any money outside of the United States. . . .

Rethinking the Law Firm Recruitment Model

February 6, 2014

Currently, all of the big firms tend to compete for the same few thousand candidates: second-years at top-tier law schools with strong grades and enough social skills to survive the interview process. But once you step outside of this echelon of the law school hierarchy, the reality is grim. . . .

It’s Time for Lawyers to Start Helping Their Clients Make Data-Driven Decisions

January 23, 2014

Today, we address another area in which lawyers and law firms have struggled to advance: measurability. Specifically, we’re talking about measuring the probability of success or failure (however those terms are defined) to assist in rendering legal advice to clients. . . .

“Pardon the Disruption: The second thing that needs to go—the law school model (Part 2).” Thomson Reuters.

December 12, 2013

Prior to the Thanksgiving holiday, we discussed the not-so-novel proposition that the U.S. legal education system requires a healthy dose of reform... In today’s post, we take principles from CIC and apply them to legal scholarship. . . .

“Spaces: The games are always on at Edelson.” Chicago Lawyer.

December 1, 2013

The orange tape lining the floor of Edelson LLC’s main lobby area is designed to mimic the lines on a tennis court — except it wraps up along a wall and part of the ceiling. The aesthetic is not accidental. . . .

“Pardon the Disruption: The second thing that needs to go—the law school model (Part 1).” Thomson Reuters.

November 21, 2013

Talk has been swirling for a while about the need to overhaul the legal education system. JD candidates crossing the stage in recent years have exited with a hefty tab and a degree that guarantees few job opportunities. And despite almost a decade of excess supply, some are claiming that law schools are running out of cash. . . .

“Pardon the Disruption: The first thing that needs to go—the billable hour.” Thomson Reuters.

November 7, 2013

The legal industry has been painfully slow to embrace change. While all around us industries re-invent themselves to reflect the times, our complexion is largely the same as it was 15 years ago . . .

“The ATL Interrogatories: 10 Questions with Jay Edelson.” Above the Law.

October 16, 2013

Jay Edelson is the founder and managing partner of Edelson LLC, a national consumer class action firm. Edelson LLC focuses on consumer technology, privacy, and banking litigation, and has secured settlements valued at over $1 billion in the last five years. . . .

“Beyond the Ping-Pong Table: Lessons for Lawyers From Startup Companies.” The National Law Journal.

September 30, 2013

"The legal field has remained tone deaf to the lessons of America's startup culture. That's unfortunate, because startups can serve as a model for innovative, efficient and invigorating work environments. . . ."
 

“End the Summer Associate Sideshow (and start treating them like the almost-lawyers they are).” Bloomberg Law.

August 20, 2013

Today’s typical summer associate program is a creature of the decades-old traditional law practice. Not unlike other aspects of that tradition, while it was born out of well meaning principles (most significantly: “attract the best and the brightest”), it has now lost its way. . . .

“The Best Law Firm Offices in America: The Finalists!” Above The Law.

August 30, 2012

Edelson McGuire’s space in Chicago might just be the coolest law office ever. A compliment to the firm’s website, the Chicago office has helped brand the boutique as an emerging leader in high-stakes technology class actions, privacy suits, and other national litigation. Taking up the entire 13th floor in a building just North of the river, if someone didn’t tell you it was a law firm you’d think they were busily coming up with the next big website or app…. [T]he office’s exposed ceilings (complete with industrial vents and piping) contrast with the hi-tech look of the office walls to provide an unmistakable start-up feel all their own.

“Court Reinstates Suit by Chicago Homeowner Against Wells Fargo.” Chicago Tribune.

March 8, 2012

A Chicago homeowner who was denied participation in a federal mortgage modification program can sue her lender for fraud and other claims, a federal appellate court said this week. . . .

“9 Mistakes Companies Make In Consumer Class Actions.” Law 360.

January 20, 2011

"Dealing with consumer class actions is one of the more significant challenges facing companies today. Innovation moves light years faster than changes in the law. . ."

“Trust Young Lawyers & They Won’t Let You Down.” American Bar Association.

October 15, 2009

Law firms are notoriously bad at training newly-minted attorneys and developing them into meaningful contributors.The problem begins with structure. . . .

“Non-Compliant Podcast Episode 38: The One Where We Talk Legal Recruiting with Major, Lindsey & Africa Managing Director Summer Eberhard”

September 24, 2021

In Non-Compliant Episode 38, Host Jay Edelson, nationally recognized plaintiff’s attorney and Founder of Edelson PC, is joined by Summer Eberhard, a Managing Director in Major, Lindsey & Africa’s Associate Practice Group, and Kelsey McCann, Edelson PC’s Chief of Staff and Director of Recruiting.

 

To start the show, Jay, Summer, and Kelsey discuss the recent shift in legal recruitment. While BigLaw was once the clear choice for law students and laterals, candidates are considering more than Vault rankings when applying to jobs. Instead of wanting to know about a firm's pro bono practice, candidates are talking to employers about how they reacted to the COVID-19 pandemic (8:30), their views on flexible work arrangements (13:45), and what diversity initiatives they have in place (20:42).

“Non-Compliant Podcast Episode 37: The One with Former Federal and State Prosecutor Elie Honing”

September 14, 2021

In Non-Compliant Episode 37, Host Jay Edelson, nationally recognized plaintiff’s attorney and Founder of Edelson PC, is joined by Elie Honing, CNN Senior Legal Analyst, former federal and state prosecutor, and bestselling author of Hatchet Man: How Bill Barr Broke the Prosecutor's Code and Corrupted the Justice Department.

Jay and Elie discuss the colossal mess Bill Barr made in undermining the justice system. Barr, the 77th and 85th United States attorney general under George H. W. Bush and Donald Trump, allowed politics to play a role in individual prosecutions. According to Elie, Barr was a political animal first (which is why he crossed so many lines) and viewed himself as Trump’s personal lawyer— using the DOJ to go after Trump’s political enemies (or perceived political enemies), protecting Trump’s political cronies, etc.

“Big Law Associate Raises Miss the Mark” National Law Journal.

September 1, 2021

As the economy picked up steam this summer, the Big Law associate salary wars predictably flared up again. Firms have been tripping over themselves to match the highest bidder. Young lawyers can be forgiven if they’ve suffered whiplash. After all, just 17 months ago, as the pandemic spread uncertainty and anxiety throughout the economy, many associates were let go, furloughed, or saw compensation cuts. Now, to meet rapidly increasing workloads, Big Law firms are desperate for talent. So they’re playing their favorite cards: salary hikes and signing bonuses.

“Non-Compliant Podcast Episode 36: The One with Author Tim Higgins”

August 25, 2021

In Non-Compliant Episode 36, Host Jay Edelson, nationally recognized plaintiff’s attorney and Founder of Edelson PC, is joined by Tim Higgins, author of Power Play: Tesla, Elon Musk, and the Bet of the Century.

To start the show, Jay and Tim discuss Tim’s experience writing the book. When Tim started writing this story in 2018, he thought it would document the collapse of Tesla (2:00). At the time, Tesla was on the brink of bankruptcy, Elon Musk was having regular meltdowns in public, and there was a lot of question on whether the company could deliver the Model 3. As time passed, the story changed from the company’s collapse, to one of the most remarkable turnarounds in a company’s history.

“Non-Compliant Podcast Episode 35: The One Where We Talk Trump Taking on Big Tech”

August 4, 2021

In Non-Compliant Episode 35, Host Jay Edelson, nationally recognized plaintiff’s attorney and Founder of Edelson PC, is joined by J. Eli Wade-Scott, former Skadden Fellow at Legal Aid Chicago and law clerk to the Honorable Rebecca Pallmeyer of the Northern District of Illinois, and current Partner at Edelson PC.

Jay and Eli discuss former President Trump’s lawsuits against Twitter, Google and Facebook for banning him from the platforms in (supposed) violation of the First Amendment, each filed as a proposed class action case with Trump as the lead plaintiff (5:15). Jay shares his views about the true purpose of the suits, and they both analyze Courts’ willingness to sanction the former President and his lawyers for filing yet more frivolous cases. (21:30).

“Non-Compliant Podcast Episode 34: The One with ISCOTUS Founder Carolyn Shapiro”

July 21, 2021

In Non-Compliant Episode 34, Host Jay Edelson, nationally recognized plaintiff’s attorney and Founder of Edelson PC, is joined by Professor Carolyn Shapiro, the founder and co-director of Chicago-Kent's Institute on the Supreme Court of the United States (ISCOTUS).

To start the show, Jay and Carolyn discuss the monumental decisions to come out of the most recent Supreme Court Session. According to Carolyn, the Chief Justices relied on their hallmark move— making decisions that do not appear to be earth shattering, but contain the seeds for significant applications and legal changes (4:20).

“Non-Compliant Podcast Episode 33: The One with Anything is Poddable Co-Host Sam Packard”

July 6, 2021

In Non-Compliant Episode 33, Host Jay Edelson, nationally recognized plaintiff’s attorney and Founder of Edelson PC, and Guest Sam Packard, Co-Host of the Boston Celtics podcast on The Athletic Podcast Network, discuss the 2020-2021 NBA season, social justice, and developing leaders.

To start the show, Jay and Sam talk about how the NBA navigated the COVID-19 pandemic and reacted to the murder of George Floyd (2:50). For the first time in the NBA’s history, racial justice issues were openly discussed, and players had the opportunity to express themselves by adding phrases, including Black Lives Matter, to their jerseys.

“Edelson P.C. Promotes 4 Partners”

May 10, 2021

National Plaintiff’s law firm, Edelson P.C., announced today that it was promoting 4 associates to the position of partner. The four new partners are: J. Aaron Lawson, Todd Logan, Alex Tievsky, and J. Eli Wade-Scott.

“Non-Compliant Podcast Episode 32: The One with Victims’ Rights Attorney Carrie Goldberg”

April 29, 2021

Calls to take down abusive and harassing content is often met with apathy from the largest tech companies. As victims of this online abuse can’t wait for law enforcement to act, social platforms must step up to remove this harmful content and step out from behind Section 230’s liability shield.

In Non-Compliant Podcast Episode 32, Host Jay Edelson, nationally recognized plaintiff’s attorney and Founder of Edelson PC, and Guest Carrie Goldberg, Founder of C.A. Goldberg Victims’ Rights Law Firm and author of Nobody’s Victim, discuss sexual harassment and abuse on the internet, the problems with Section 230, and why Big Tech companies need to do more to stop online predators

“Non-Compliant Podcast Episode 31:The One Where We Get Nostalgic With Class Action Park Co-Director Seth Porges”

March 12, 2021

The nostalgia of the 80’s and 90’s is a driving force of our pop-culture today. With the rise of streaming services like Netflix and thrilling documentaries like HBO Max’s Class Action Park, it is now easier than ever to get a glimpse into that era and make us push the limits of our recollections of the past.

 

In Non-Compliant Podcast Episode 31, Host Jay Edelson, nationally recognized plaintiff’s attorney and Founder of Edelson PC, and Guest Seth Porges, Co-Director of hit HBO Max documentary Class Action Park, discuss the murky areas of nostalgia, the wild story of Action Park, the rise of streaming services, and the process of making a documentary.

“Non-Compliant Podcast Episode 30: The One Where We Talk About Disrupting the Legal Industry with Sara O’Reill‪y‬”

March 8, 2021

The legal profession is going through a period of disruption that is leading some firms to think creatively by bringing in non-lawyer executives and consultants to run their day-to-day operations. The vision of seasoned business executives can help many firms take it to the next level, while allowing lawyers to focus on what matters the most: practicing the law and getting significant results for their clients. In Non-Compliant Podcast Episode 30, Host Jay Edelson, nationally recognized plaintiff’s attorney and Founder of Edelson PC, and Guest Sara O’Reilly, Chief Executive Officer at HMB Legal, discuss what it’s like running a law firm as a non-lawyer, why firm’s need to professionalize their business operations, and why diversity is imperative to the long-term success of the legal industry.

“Non-Compliant Podcast Episode 29: The One Where We Discuss The SolarWinds Cyberattack With Edelson’s Digital Forensics Director Shawn Davis”

February 18, 2021

The SolarWinds attack reminded everyone that the U.S. government, major corporations, and small businesses can all fall victim to sophisticated supply chain attacks. What went wrong and how can we limit the impact of the next attack? In Non-Compliant Podcast Episode 29, Host Jay Edelson, nationally recognized plaintiff’s attorney and founder of Edelson PC, and Guest Shawn Davis, the firm’s Director of Digital Forensics and leader of the firm’s tech investigations team, discuss the SolarWinds hack, vendor cybersecurity, geopolitical fall-out of cyberattacks, and what everyday companies can do to up their information security game.

“Non-Compliant Podcast Episode 28: The One Where We Discuss Overconfidence With Professor Don Moor‪e‬”

February 16, 2021

From Lebron James to Barack Obama, confidence plays an important role in success. But there is a fine line between taking calculated risks based on your skills and ignoring the high-chance of failure that comes with every venture. That is why people must appreciate their level of confidence to better approach business decisions, negations, and the hiring process. In Non-Compliant Podcast Episode 28, Host Jay Edelson, nationally recognized plaintiff’s attorney and founder of Edelson PC, and Guest Don Moore, overconfidence and organizations professor at the UC Berkeley Haas School of Business” discuss overconfidence, how confidence plays a role in negotiations, and how to change the recruitment process to better, and more fairly, measure future success.

“Non-Compliant Podcast Episode 27: The One Where We Lift the Veil on Legal Recruiting with Kelsey McCan‪n”

February 11, 2021

The law school recruitment process is broken. Law schools don’t do enough to prepare law students for their dream jobs, and they continue to push Big Law as the safe choice. However, this is misguided, and law students need to take off their blinders once and for all. In Non-Compliant Podcast Episode 27, Host Jay Edelson, nationally recognized plaintiff’s attorney and founder of Edelson PC, and Guest Kelsey McCann, the firm’s Chief of Staff and recruiting director, Big Law’s Big Lie, and how law students can do a better job of getting their dream summer associate position.

“Big Law Refuted: Plaintiffs Firms Offer a Less-Traveled Route to Success” National Law Journal.

February 3, 2021

The U.S. legal industry does a lot of things well. At its best, it allows people access to justice through a fair and open process. It also allows individuals to take on the largest corporations, uncover and correct injustices, and challenge those in positions of power in ways that would be unthinkable in many countries. The legal industry, however, has baked-in disadvantages. Lawyers have been trained to think backwards in solving new problems. What is the law governing a new IoT device? Let’s see how courts looked at somewhat analogous situations 20 years ago. Though this way of thinking creates a type of grounding that is important to make the law stable, it comes with blinders. This is the problem facing legal recruitment. Thirty years ago, law students at top schools were ceremoniously ushered into the world of Big Law. On-campus interviewing was the norm for “top” firms. If you wanted another job—which meant government work, public interest or academia—you had to hustle. Law school recruitment offices made it clear that Big Law jobs were easy to get and were the safest choice. The argument was simple: Big Law is stable; you will make tons of money; you will get the best training; and your options to do something later in your career will be preserved. All of that may have been true at the time. Countless students who went to law school to fight for the little guy or make a difference in the world found their ways to large firms that were created to serve the interests of the elite. The trade-off wasn’t horrible and the amount of money offered was real. Things started to change in the late 1990s. Lawyers focused on profits-per-partner and realized that if they had a good book of business, they could simply move to firms willing to pay more. Almost overnight, the days of law as a profession—instead of as a business—were doomed. Fast forward to today and the legal market has fundamentally changed. Large law firms generally don’t expect associates to stay longer than a few years. As such, young associates are viewed as temporary workers who are expected to bill a large number of hours. Legal training took a back seat, as a new framework emerged. Just like partners realized they could make more money by abandoning feelings of loyalty, firms abandoned the idea that they owed anything long term to those they hired. The impact came into focus during the pandemic. Many firms cynically viewed the pandemic as an opportunity to cut fat, modernize, and increase profitability. Summer associate programs got slashed, incoming associate offers were pulled or delayed, and support staff were fired. Law firms are businesses, and they are allowed to run their business in any (legal) way they want to. The idea that large law firms are focused first and foremost on profits should surprise no one. The problem is that the messaging by law schools, law firms and recruiters has not caught up to reality. Law students are still being fed the same lines from three decades ago: “Go to big law; it’s stable. You’ll get the best training. You’ll have so many options once you save enough money to actually follow your dreams.” That’s simply not true. The legal field is filled with career paths that are rarely, if ever, discussed in law school. As someone who has interviewed over 500 law students and lawyers during the past three years, I am constantly amazed that I have to explain that, by definition, half of all litigation is done by plaintiffs attorneys. Although many plaintiffs firms act like big law firms (hierarchical, stuffy, siloed), many do not. Plaintiffs firms’ business models are significantly more innovative because they must always look toward the future and embrace risk. Many people think that innovation means having a volleyball court in the office. While that’s true at our firm, it misses the point. Plaintiffs firms do not make their money by billing the largest number of hours. Instead, they make their money by winning cases. Though this may seem to be a trite point, it is not. It changes everything. The best plaintiffs firms understand the value that comes from the ingenuity of its employees. That means that training young attorneys and giving them outsized responsibilities are paramount. Those that learn and grow are no mere interchangeable cogs that are kept at the mercy of their bosses. By getting real experience, they have a much better ability to switch to other firms—yes, including defense firms. The same cannot be said for those that internalized the messaging of their law school, law firms and legal recruiters. Every week I get applications from candidates at Vault 100 firms and they all share similar stories—they graduated at the top of their class from a T14, put in their time at a prestigious firm, and are ready to cash in their chips for the dream job they were promised. Unfortunately, these candidates are often met with rejection. The reason? They all share painfully similar resumes. The candidates list the following four responsibilities: (1) drafted memos; (2) managed large-scale document review; (3) trained incoming associates; and (4) second-chaired a deposition. (In reality, second chairing a deposition means handing relevant paperwork to the partner conducting the deposition.) It’s important to note I am not looking to diminish the careers of these candidates. Rather, I am highlighting that every firm has different definitions of “substantive work,” which impacts the lateral moves candidates can make. This may be true, many argue, but it ignores the fact that big firms pay more and law school isn’t cheap. The problem with that argument is that it too isn’t fully based in fact. Plaintiffs firms offer different compensation models and some simply match or outdo Big Law salaries. The point is not that law students should be blindly heading to the plaintiffs bar; it is certainly not meant for everyone. Rather, law students should shed their blinders once and for all. There are so many opportunities and the decision between one legal career and another is as important as deciding whether one wants to open a restaurant or build bridges. The days of having one clear, safe choice are over, and they have been for some time. The legal industry just doesn’t know it yet. 2/3/21 edition of the National Law Journal© 2021 ALM Media Properties, LLC. All rights reserved. Further duplication without permission is prohibited, contact 877-257-3382 or [email protected]

“Non-Compliant Podcast Episode 25: The One Where We Talk About Partisanship, Insurrection and Impeachment with Dr. Lara Brown”

January 26, 2021

The Capitol Insurrection shook our nation as then-President Trump incited a violent mob to go after one of our sacred institutions. While Trump’s divisive rhetoric was the main cause of the attack, a deep-partisan divide in our nation and the lack of real moral leadership in the GOP added fuel to the fire. In Non-Compliant Podcast Episode 25, Host Jay Edelson, nationally recognized plaintiff’s attorney and Founder of Edelson PC, and Guest Dr. Lara Brown, associate professor and director of the Graduate School of Political Management at the George Washington University, discuss the deep-rooted partisan divide in Washington that led to the rise of Trump, what led to the Capitol Insurrection, and the upcoming Senate impeachment trial.

“Non-Compliant Podcast Episode 24: The One Where We Talk About the Real Housewives with Kate Casey”

January 12, 2021

Legal issues surrounding Real Housewives of Beverly Hills star Erika Jayne and her husband, well-known plaintiff’s attorney Thomas Girardi, have captivated both fans of the show and the legal profession alike. This intersection reminds listeners that real-world legal issues can have profound impacts on reality television, lawyers, and how both are viewed in the press, the entertainment industry, and among colleagues. In Non-Compliant Podcast Episode 24, Host Jay Edelson, nationally recognized plaintiff’s attorney and Founder of Edelson PC, and Guest Kate Casey, the host of Reality Life with Kate Casey Podcast, discuss the ongoing allegations against Tom and Erika, the couple’s power dynamic, Tom’s fall from grace as a leading plaintiff’s lawyer, and how to handle a crisis in the entertainment industry.

“Non-Compliant Podcast Episode 23: The One Where We Talk Pardons with Kimberly Wehle”

December 22, 2020

President Trump is reportedly set to issue a wide swath of pardons that may include close confidants and family members. There are also talks of Trump issuing a pardon for himself to stave off possible federal investigations. Trump’s probable use of the pardon power is likely to push the boundaries of Constitutional norms and may wind up empowering future presidents to go even further.

“Non-Compliant Episode 22: The One Where Law Students Take on Big Law and the Climate Crisis”

December 9, 2020

Law students can have a big impact on the climate crisis when they push back on Big Law’s ties to the fossil fuel industry. In Episode 22, we meet with Camila Bustos, a third year at Yale Law School and a founder of Law Students for Climate Accountability, to discuss what it is like to take on Big Law and the climate crisis. Non-Compliant Host Jay Edelson, the Founder and CEO of a prominent plaintiff’s firm, and Camila also discuss why students should stand up when reforms are needed and other job options for law students besides Big Law.

“Non-Compliant Episode 21: The One Where Two Plaintiff’s Attorneys Try to Disagree”

November 24, 2020

The pandemic is leaving its mark on how plaintiff’s attorneys practice law from online depositions to virtual court hearings. It has also exposed an ongoing issue with law firm summer associate recruitment that has left many without experience handling complex issues or creating novel theories of law. In Episode 21, we meet with Eric Cramer, Chairman of plaintiff’s firm Berger Montague and President of Public Justice, to discuss how the pandemic impacted law firm operations, why firms need to change how they recruit summer associates, and how law students can find their dream job in the plaintiff’s bar.

“Non-Compliant Episode 20: The One Where We Talk About Trump’s Attempt To Undermine The Election Live with Georgia State Law Professor Anthony Kreis”

November 10, 2020

President Trump is bringing legal challenges that seek to cast doubt on the results of the election. While this strategy is unlikely to prevail, it could undermine President-Elect Biden's push to unify the country. In Episode 20, we meet with Anthony Kreis, a constitutional law professor at Georgia State University College of Law, to discuss Trump's legal actions, what role a conservative Supreme Court may play, and how Biden could overcome challenges to close gaps between both parties. Non-Compliant Host Jay Edelson, the Founder and CEO of a prominent plaintiff's firm, and Anthony will answer listener questions and also discuss the election results in Georgia and the upcoming Senate run-offs.

“Non-Compliant Episode 19: The One Where We Discuss the 2020 Election Live with FiveThirtyEight Contributor and Professor Julia Azari”

November 4, 2020

The outcome of the 2020 Election is beginning to take shape, but many of us still have questions about the results, where polling went wrong, how massive turnout still led to a very divided electorate, and what it means for our country as President Donald Trump openly undermines election results. In Episode 19 we meet with Julia Azari, a political science professor at Marquette University, contributor at FiveThirtyEight, and blogger at Mischiefs of Faction, to break down the election results and where our country goes from here. Non-Compliant Host Jay Edelson, the Founder and CEO of a prominted plaintiff's firm, and Julia will answer listener questions and help provide clarity as votes are still being counted in key states for Joe Biden.

“Non-Compliant Episode 18: The One Where We Debate Whether Trump is a Good Negotiator”

October 28, 2020

President Donald Trump is a self-proclaimed master negotiator who is famously behind the Art of the Deal. Trump, however, has bungled many international and domestic negotiations that have severely harmed U.S. interests. With the election looming, the president’s negotiation style often fits that of a strong-arm dictator rather than that of the leader of the free world. In Episode 18 we meet with Maurice Schweitzer, an emotions and negotiations professor at the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania and author of Friend & Foe, to break down how Trump fails during high stakes talks. Non-Compliant Host Jay Edelson, the Founder and CEO of a prominent plaintiff’s firm, and Maurice also discuss how to successfully navigate high-pressure situations and why you must be both a friend and foe with adversaries during negotiations.

“Law Firm Leaders: Edelson’s Jay Edelson” Law360.

October 28, 2020

Jay Edelson is the founder and CEO of Edelson PC, a 30-lawyer plaintiffs firm focusing on class and mass actions, public client investigations and prosecutions. Here, Edelson spoke with Law360 about how his Chicago-based firm has evolved since it launched 13 years ago, what distinguishes it from other plaintiffs firms and how its approach to retaining talent changed during the coronavirus pandemic.

“A Plaintiff-Side View on Big Law Bloat, COVID Cutbacks and the ‘Secret Sauce’ for Landing Mega Settlements” Legal Speak.

October 23, 2020

So far, Jay Edelson, the founder of 30-lawyer plaintiffs firm Edelson P.C., has been doing his level best to adjust to practicing in the pandemic. The firm is in growth mode, managed a successful summer associate program and is focusing on class actions against big banks and insurers arising from the COVID-19 crisis.

“Non-Compliant Episode 17: The One With a Defense Attorney”

September 15, 2020

In Episode 17 we meet with John Beisiner, the leader of Skadden’s Mass Torts, Insurance and Consumer Litigation Group. Over the past 35 years, John has defended major U.S. and international corporations in more than 600 class actions filed in federal courts and in 40 state courts at both the trial and appellate levels.

“Non-Compliant Episode 16: The One Where Jay Gets (Even More) Honest.”

August 20, 2020

There is no denying that COVID-19 will permanently redefine the legal field. We've seen firms reduce their workforce, cancel summer associate programs, and implement hiring freezes. But what does all of this mean for the future? In Episode 16, guest host Ben Richman asks Jay questions submitted by our listeners-- everything from why BigLaw is struggling, to how to stand out during the recruitment process, to how to find your passion.

“Former Illinois State Representative Arthur Turner, Jr. Joins Edelson PC in Chicago.” Business Wire.

August 5, 2020

Edelson PC, a leading national plaintiff’s law firm, is pleased to announce that Arthur Turner, Jr. has joined the firm as Of Counsel in Chicago. Turner will primarily work alongside the firm’s Litigation team. From December 2010 through early July of this year, Turner served as the State Representative for Illinois’ 9th House District on the west side of Chicago. As a legislator, he worked tirelessly on behalf of Illinois citizens to increase economic development, protect their personal privacy and provide access to quality health care. Turner joined the House’s leadership team in 2013 as Assistant Majority Leader and became Deputy Majority Leader in 2017. He served as the Chairperson of the Judiciary – Criminal Law Committee and as a member of various other committees including Small Business Empowerment and Workforce Development, Consumer Protection, and Cybersecurity, Data Analytics & IT. Turner was also previously Of Counsel at Miller, Canfield, Paddock, and Stone, P.L.C.

“Non-Compliant Episode 15: The One Where the Illinois Retail Merchants Association Talks with a Plaintiff’s Attorney.”

July 29, 2020

In Episode 15 we meet with Rob Carr, the President and CEO of the Illinois Retail Merchants Association (IRMA). From the nation’s largest retailers to independent businesses, IRMA serves as the voice of Illinois retailing, providing full-time advocacy services and representation in front of State, Cook County, and City of Chicago policy makers.

 

While some might believe that Jay, the Founder and CEO of a prominent plaintiff’s firm, and Rob are mortal enemies, they dive into a spirited discussion about the legislative process, consumer protection, and privacy laws. Spoiler alert— Jay and Rob disagree on a lot, but they also believe there is room for collaboration.

“Non-Compliant Episode 14: The (Second) One Where Professor Nancy Rapoport Discusses the Future of Law Firms.”

July 14, 2020

In Episode 13 of Non-Compliant, we had the first part of our conversation with Processor Nancy Rapoport. During the episode, we discussed how COVID-19 will permanently redefine how lawyers work and their need for a physical workspace, fee arrangements, and how cases are billed. In part two of our conversation with Professor Rapoport, we focus on the impact of COVID-19 on law firm staffing, the hiring and recruitment process, and diversity initiatives.

“Law Firm Leaders’ 3 Biggest Worries For The Rest Of 2020.” Law360.

July 10, 2020

While law firm leaders are looking at the future with cautious optimism, there are major concerns for the legal field moving forward. With #COVID19 numbers increasing across the country, we expect the pandemic to last well into next year. As we prepare for the future, we’ve shifted our policies on remote working-- we believe people can work as well (or better) from a remote workspace, which is why we no longer require our employees to be in the same cities as our physical offices. While we've adapted our practices, we are still incredibly focused on diversity and inclusion efforts. "With most law firms focused on efficient business practices, teleworking and finances, diversity is ranked at the bottom of the priority list for many. As seen in the last recession … women and Black attorneys are the most likely to be laid off and have their salaries reduced. With that in mind, we are focused on continuing our efforts to diversify our team, and the legal field more generally." Our Founder and CEO Jay Edelson spoke with Law360 about the impact of the global pandemic on the legal field, and his concerns moving forward.

“Non-Compliant Episode 13: The One Where Professor Nancy Rapoport Discusses the Future of Law Firms.”

July 1, 2020

COVID-19 will permanently redefine the legal field. From how lawyers work and their need for a physical workspace, to fee arrangements, and the types of cases filed. Over the last few months, we’ve seen significant changes in BigLaw—firms have reduced their workforce, implemented hiring freezes, and shortened/ canceled their summer programs. Professor Nancy Rapoport joins us this week to discuss the evolving legal landscape and navigating a path forward. Join us next week for part two of our discussion with the Professor.

“Non-Compliant Episode 12: The One Where Prominent Trial Attorney Tony Romanucci Discusses Representing the Family of George Floyd.”

June 17, 2020

Our country is at a tipping point after the recent murder of George Floyd. Black Lives Matter is not just having a moment - we’re at the beginning of an important movement that has spurred not only calls for reforming our police and justice systems, but a fundamental shift in American culture.

In this episode, we’re honored to welcome Tony Ramunucci, founding partner at Romanucci & Blandin, LLC and one of the lawyers representing the Floyd family. Tony tells Mr. Floyd’s story and talks about how his family is coping, the “Code of Silence” among police officers and the culture of impunity, and what’s been happening across the country as a result of Mr. Floyd’s death. He also discusses aspects of the criminal case and whether civil cases are going to be filed. Listen in to hear this informative discussion.

“Statement by Edelson PC on the Murder of George Floyd.”

June 4, 2020

We would like to take a moment to share our thoughts about the murder of George Floyd, the resulting peaceful protests, and the violence and chaos that seems to be egged on by the President and others who want America to be less stable, less just, and less kind.

“COVID-19 Task Force Privacy Newsletter: Volume 2.”

April 3, 2020

We realize that people are quickly transitioning to using new technologies to keep in contact with co-workers and family. Therefore, this issue will provide guides focusing on usage, privacy, and troubleshooting for a number of popular platforms.

“COVID-19 Task Force Privacy Newsletter: Volume 1.”

March 25, 2020

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, many people are now working remotely and connecting with friends and family online. Unfortunately, we’re also seeing new cyberthreats and scams emerge. Check out our inaugural privacy newsletter for tips from our experts on how to stay safe online.

“Non-Compliant Episode 10: The One Where Jay Edelson Addresses the Coronavirus and Answers Your Questions.”

March 20, 2020

We are in a unique moment in history with the global COVID-19 pandemic. In the finale episode of Non-Compliant season 1, guest host Ben Richman talks with Jay about the impact of this unprecedented event, including the steps the firm is taking to address it and how leaders should be doing more to support their communities. We then switch gears, with Jay answering questions submitted by our listeners - everything from what it was like to litigate (and win) against Facebook, to advice for law students looking to get into plaintiff's work, to who would win in a fight between a ham sandwich and a taco.

“Non-Compliant Episode 9: The One Where We Ask For Listener Questions.”

February 26, 2020

Special Alert: We are planning our finale for our first season of Non-Compliant where Jay will be answering listener questions. Check out this special episode with a guest host for more details. Email questions you want posed to Jay on the finale to [email protected]

“Non-Compliant Episode 8: The One Where We Ask if Big Tech Has Infiltrated Public Interest Privacy Organizations.”

February 19, 2020

Most people assume that the battle lines are clearly drawn in the fight over our privacy. On one side, we have Big Tech and the Chamber of Commerce. On the other side, we have governmental actors, the plaintiff’s bar, and public interest organizations. Well, not so fast. In this challenging episode of the show, we talk to Joe Jerome, a veteran of the public interest world. And Joe is immediately put on the hot seat. While most public interest organizations (like the ACLU, EPIC, etc.) are what they purport to be, Jay argues that some are the proverbial wolves in sheep’s clothes. Is it true that Big Tech has started financing these organizations and even infiltrated their boards? Is that why these organizations often argue for “compromise” privacy legislation that really is just a collection of Big Tech’s wish lists? Hear both sides of the argument in the newest episode of Non-Compliant.

“Non-Compliant Episode 7: The One Where Award Winning Journalist Dan Levine Reports That The ‘Public’ Court System is Less Public Than We All Thought.”

February 4, 2020

In past episodes, we have explored the under-reported inner workings of high stakes plaintiff’s law. This time, we have the perspective of one of the nation’s top journalists. Reuters reporter Dan Levine comes on the show to discuss his award-winning series, “Hidden Justice.” Based on a systematic review of some of the major cases of the day, Dan’s reporting concludes that the court system often seals from public view facts that directly impact the health and safety of our citizens. Dan argues that, instead of shining a light on issues ranging from cars with rollover problems, to prescription medication that have life threatening side effects, key court documents revealing these issues often aren’t made publicly available for years (if ever). Who, if anyone, shares responsibility for this? And will proposed federal legislation fix this? Tune in for an exciting discussion.

“Non-Compliant Episode 6: The One Where Illinois State Representative Ann Williams Takes The Fight to Big Tech (and others).”

January 28, 2020

In Episode 6, we speak with Illinois State Representative Ann Williams. We all know that the political climate is toxic and broken. The federal government simply isn’t working for regular Americans. While some of us give up, Representative Williams sees unique opportunities at the state level. Williams takes us through some of the hardest fought political fights over privacy and explains how to battle back against Big Tech and the endless resources they have to shut down even an honest discussion. We don’t like to throw around the word “visionary” loosely, but Williams shows how important it is for politicians to be thinking years ahead, whether it comes to privacy, the environment, or protecting women’s reproductive rights in a potentially post-Roe world. If anyone thinks politicians are only concerned about themselves, this episode will change your mind.

“Non-Compliant Episode 5: The One Where Elizabeth Chamblee Burch Takes on the Mass Tort Bar.”

January 24, 2020

Mass torts are big business. From suits about defective hip implants, to claims that Big Pharma has injured or killed thousands of people, to litigation over the concussions suffered by football players, mass personal injury suits take up a significant portion of the federal and state dockets. And they often lead to tremendous results, with multi-billion-dollar settlements and industry-wide reforms. But law professor and author Elizabeth Chamblee Burch argues that all is not calm beneath the surface. In her electrifying new book, Mass Tort Deals: Backroom Bargaining in Multi-District Litigation (https://www.elizabethchambleeburch.com/), Burch takes on the plaintiff’s bar over claims of self-dealing and hardball tactics. And she names names. In this episode of Non-Compliant, Burch demonstrates that she is not afraid of a robust conversation with Jay, who has spent two decades fighting corporate America, including through the multi-district litigation procedures. Heck, Jay is lead counsel in the NCAA concussion cases, litigating issues Burch writes about extensively. While Jay is happy to both concede that the plaintiff’s bar is far from perfect, he also pushes back at some of Burch’s underlying theories. This all makes for a fun and substantive conversation around a topic that is extremely under-reported.

“Above The Law’s Thinking Like A Lawyer Podcast: Life On The Other Side Of The V.”

January 21, 2020

When it comes to litigation, law schools generally funnel students into larger, defense-oriented firms. These firms offer steady paychecks — all the better to pay your monthly debt bill, my dear — and a tried and true path. But there is another side to the “v” and it often involves better opportunities and more rewarding work. Joe and Elie chat with Edelson PC about the tech-oriented plaintiff and class action firm’s work from protecting biometric privacy rights to addressing sexual misconduct in youth sports with partner Chris Dore and associates Aaron Lawson and Sydney Janzen.

“Non-Compliant Episode 4: The One Where the FBI Spied on A Community for Four Decades.”

January 21, 2020

In Episode 4 we meet with Filmmaker Assia Boundoui and human rights attorney Christina Abraham to discuss the award-winning documentary "The Feeling of Being Watched". (http://www.feelingofbeingwatched.com/). After spending the beginning of her career as a journalist for BBC, VICE, and CNN, Assia discusses her transition to filmmaker and her first project—looking into the FBI surveillance of her own Bridgeview, Illinois community. Assia takes us through her investigation, including uncovering tens of thousands of FBI documents proving that her Arab-American community was the subject of one of the largest counterterrorism investigations, code-named “Operation Vulgar Betrayal”, conducted on U.S. soil before 9/11. She then leads us on her journey to end the government’s secrecy over their four decade investigation and discusses the impact that constant surveillance – something Big Tech is racing to make happen -- has on individuals.  Is Judge Richard Posner correct when he argued that “privacy is mainly about trying to improve your social and business opportunities by concealing the sorts of bad activities that would cause other people not to want to deal with you?”  Or does being constantly monitored take away some quintessential truth about the American experience?

“Non-Compliant Episode 3: The One Where Author Todd Henderson Argues that Tech Companies are Ushering In a New Era of Trust and Cooperation.”

January 8, 2020

In Episode 3, we take a break from the law and sit down with author Todd Henderson to discuss his new book, The Trust Revolution: How the Digitization of Trust Will Revolutionize Business and Government. Henderson argues that with the advent of companies like Lyft, AirBnB, and others fueling the “sharing economy,” we are in the middle of a new era in trust and cooperation that promises to forever change the world. After all, ten years ago no one would have thought to rent a random person’s house in a foreign country, use another person's car to travel while there, and drop off her dog for the week at yet another stranger’s pet-sitting service. Henderson argues that individual reviewers serve as “micro-regulators” giving us faith that the service or product we are getting will be safe and useful.
None of this goes down too easy for Jay, who has spent the last two decades taking on BigTech and does not view it as the paradigm of trustworthiness. But, one thing that Jay is forced to concede is that Henderson’s newest book made him rethink how he views the world.

“Non-Compliant Episode 2: The One Where Ted Frank Takes On Class Action Attorneys.”

January 7, 2020

In Episode 1, we heard from a surprising proponent of class action lawsuits. Now we hear from the other side, as prominent (and enigmatic) public interest objector Ted Frank joins the show. Proving why the New York Times called him the “leading critic of abusing class-action settlements” in the country, Ted pulls no punches. He argues that many settlements are rigged in favor of attorneys and explains why he thinks plaintiff’s lawyers could be targeted with antitrust lawsuits or (gasp) even malpractice class actions in the future. Ted also talks about how he chooses his cases, why he is rarely worried about what happens in the trial courts, and why he thinks one of his objections (maybe even Equifax) might soon end up in the Supreme Court.
And for dessert, Jay plays a part of his firm’s new rap song, which gives a shout out to Ted.

“Non-Compliant Episode 1: The One Where A Conservative Thinks Class Actions Are Good.”

December 12, 2019

In our first ever episode, we have law professor Brian Fitzpatrick on the show. Brian's never voted for a Democrat in his life. He clerked for Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia (not known to be particularly liberally). And he won an award from the Federalist Society. So why did he write a book called “The Conservative Case for Class Actions?” We dive deep into a spirited discussion over whether class actions are good for the country. (Spoiler alert, even Jay thinks that many are not.) Whether you agree or disagree, you will hear a radically new view of the politics behind the class action device and which pieces are working and which ones aren’t. For more about Professor Fitzpatrick, visit his website www.briantfitzpatrick.com.

“Edelson PC Launches “Non-Compliant” Podcast and Edelson Creative Platform”

December 12, 2019

Latest creative endeavors from renowned Chicago plaintiffs’ law firm offer unique insights on the law, and just about everything else, too.

“Illinois Unions File Lawsuit Against Opioid Manufacturers.” The Construction User.

February 13, 2019

A Q&A with Ari Scharg of Edelson PC  In February, the Chicago Regional Council of Carpenters and the International Union of Operating Engineers Local 150 filed the first ever lawsuit brought by Illinois unions against several opioid manufacturers, distributors, and prescribers. The Illinois Unions want to hold drug companies accountable for the crisis impacting their communities and families in a very real way, “more than anything else, a win would mean creating a safer environment for Carpenters, Operating Engineers and others in the construction industry.”

“Battling Bullies: Chicago Litigator Takes on Power Brokers.” Of Counsel.

March 1, 2018

Big banks. Big tech firms. Big Pharma. The big business that is the NCAA. Plaintiff’s attorney Jay Edelson wages battle against many of the nation’s most fortified institutions. Not only does he refuse to back down to anyone, regardless of their stature or deep pockets, he welcomes the challenge.

“The Opioid Epidemic.” City Club of Chicago.

December 6, 2017

Moderated by Hon. Toni Preckwinkle, featuring Hon. Patrick Kennedy, Jay Edelson, and Dr. Steven Aks

“The Privacy Advisor Podcast: Jay Edelson.” iapp.

October 31, 2016

Jay Edelson is now one of best-known lawyers in the field, in part because of his aggressive pursuit of giant tech firms and their uses of consumer data.

“Modernizing Vs. Weakening The TCPA.” Law360.

September 30, 2016

The FCC and our judicial system have provided a comprehensive process to update the TCPA and keep it current with ever changing technology. Any changes at the congressional level should be done carefully and in a nuanced fashion to avoid opening sought-after loopholes that have unintended consequences.

“Law Firms and Data Breaches: Sensitive Data and Dangerous Practices.” Junto.

August 23, 2016

A Q&A with Jay Edelson of Edelson PC Hacking incidents at law firms have led to major data breach events in recent months. Even as all law firms store and handle sensitive client data, many of the smaller organizations tend to lack robust cybersecurity policies and procedures.

“High Court Gets It Right With ‘Spokeo’ Decision.” The National Law Journal

May 31, 2016

"In Spokeo v. Robins, in which we represented the plaintiff, Spokeo Inc. made the unprecedented argument to the U.S. Supreme Court that to establish "injury in fact" standing in statutory cases, the plaintiff must allege "real-world" or "palpable" harm beyond the statutory violation. Not only did Spokeo's argument fail to secure five votes, it didn't garner any. . . ."

“Peter Thiel Proves Silicon Valley Only Hates Lawsuits When It’s the One Getting Sued.” Quartz.

May 27, 2016

"Silicon Valley purports to hate the legal system. To hear the tech world tell it, lawyers are leeches and regulations are mostly outdated. Lawsuits stifle innovation and waste money that startups could better spend developing products and recruiting more users, thereby making the world a better place. . . ."

“Trump’s Wall Misses the Mark: We Need a Cyber Wall, Not a Physical One.” TechCrunch.

May 27, 2016

"The issues for the general election campaign have, to a great extent, already been framed. And Donald Trump, being the world-class marketer he is, has successfully forced a debate about whether the U.S. needs to build a wall across the 1,954 miles of our southern border to secure our great nation. . . ."

“Theranos Exposes the Perverse Incentives at Work in Silicon Valley.” Quartz.

April 29, 2016

"Theranos, the health technology company once valued at $9 billion, is making its investors’ blood run cold... While the rise and fall of Theranos has been dramatic, it is far from a rare case. . . ."

“Michigan is about to let more of your privacy go to data miners.” MLive.

April 20, 2016

Silicon Valley hates privacy laws. And it's no surprise why. Companies like Facebook, Google and Instagram succeed by collecting and monetizing consumer data . . .

“The FBI has a big ulterior motive in its fight against Apple.” Quartz.

March 18, 2016

When a public interest group wants to create new legal precedent, its first step is to find a client with sympathetic facts. But the public may not realize that the government employs this legal tactic as well. . . .

“Commentary: Why Apple is right to tangle with the FBI.” Chicago Tribune.

February 24, 2016

For the past decade I've spent my professional life fighting tech giants over consumer privacy issues. I've been called Silicon Valley's "most feared and loathed" attorney, "tech's baby-faced boogeyman" and — my personal favorite — a "leech tarted up as a freedom fighter." Given that, I never thought I would be standing with Apple in a high-stakes privacy battle. . . .

“Pick-Offs After Campbell-Ewald: Some Predictions.” Law360.

January 21, 2016

On Wednesday, the U.S. Supreme Court rightly rejected Campbell-Ewald Co.’s attempt to settle out plaintiff Jose Gomez’s individual claim to, in Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s words, “avoid a potential adverse decision, one that would expose it to damages a thousand-fold larger than the bid Gomez declined to accept.” . . .

Let the Externs Get Paid

March 6, 2014

Last month the American Bar Association’s (ABA) Section of Legal Education Standards Review Committee recommended that the organization reverse its policy forbidding law students from being paid to participate in for-credit externships. That’s good news both for law students and our profession as a whole. . . .

Rethinking the Law Firm Recruitment Model

February 6, 2014

Currently, all of the big firms tend to compete for the same few thousand candidates: second-years at top-tier law schools with strong grades and enough social skills to survive the interview process. But once you step outside of this echelon of the law school hierarchy, the reality is grim. . . .

It’s Time for Lawyers to Start Helping Their Clients Make Data-Driven Decisions

January 23, 2014

Today, we address another area in which lawyers and law firms have struggled to advance: measurability. Specifically, we’re talking about measuring the probability of success or failure (however those terms are defined) to assist in rendering legal advice to clients. . . .

“Pardon the Disruption: The second thing that needs to go—the law school model (Part 2).” Thomson Reuters.

December 12, 2013

Prior to the Thanksgiving holiday, we discussed the not-so-novel proposition that the U.S. legal education system requires a healthy dose of reform... In today’s post, we take principles from CIC and apply them to legal scholarship. . . .

“Pardon the Disruption: The second thing that needs to go—the law school model (Part 1).” Thomson Reuters.

November 21, 2013

Talk has been swirling for a while about the need to overhaul the legal education system. JD candidates crossing the stage in recent years have exited with a hefty tab and a degree that guarantees few job opportunities. And despite almost a decade of excess supply, some are claiming that law schools are running out of cash. . . .

“Pardon the Disruption: The first thing that needs to go—the billable hour.” Thomson Reuters.

November 7, 2013

The legal industry has been painfully slow to embrace change. While all around us industries re-invent themselves to reflect the times, our complexion is largely the same as it was 15 years ago . . .

“The ATL Interrogatories: 10 Questions with Jay Edelson.” Above the Law.

October 16, 2013

Jay Edelson is the founder and managing partner of Edelson LLC, a national consumer class action firm. Edelson LLC focuses on consumer technology, privacy, and banking litigation, and has secured settlements valued at over $1 billion in the last five years. . . .

“Beyond the Ping-Pong Table: Lessons for Lawyers From Startup Companies.” The National Law Journal.

September 30, 2013

"The legal field has remained tone deaf to the lessons of America's startup culture. That's unfortunate, because startups can serve as a model for innovative, efficient and invigorating work environments. . . ."
 

“End the Summer Associate Sideshow (and start treating them like the almost-lawyers they are).” Bloomberg Law.

August 20, 2013

Today’s typical summer associate program is a creature of the decades-old traditional law practice. Not unlike other aspects of that tradition, while it was born out of well meaning principles (most significantly: “attract the best and the brightest”), it has now lost its way. . . .

“9 Mistakes Companies Make In Consumer Class Actions.” Law 360.

January 20, 2011

"Dealing with consumer class actions is one of the more significant challenges facing companies today. Innovation moves light years faster than changes in the law. . ."

“Trust Young Lawyers & They Won’t Let You Down.” American Bar Association.

October 15, 2009

Law firms are notoriously bad at training newly-minted attorneys and developing them into meaningful contributors.The problem begins with structure. . . .

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